Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for March 31st, 2019


Mark 16: The End

Fourth Sunday of Lent, March 31, 2019

Women at Jesus’ Tomb

I am always fascinated by the last words in the short ending version of Mark’s Gospel: They said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.  Commentary tells us that Mark’s was likely the first of the Gospels to be recorded; Jesus’ followers tell of their experience in the face of persecution and doubt.  Scholars also tell us that a second writer tagged the story with a more positive, second ending.  Verses 9 to 20 give the reader fresh hope. “This passage, termed the Longer Ending to the Marcan gospel by comparison with a much briefer conclusion found in some manuscripts, has traditionally been accepted as a canonical part of the gospel and was defined as such by the Council of Trent.  Early citations of it by the Fathers indicate that it was composed by the second century, although the vocabulary and style indicate that it was written by someone other than Mark.  It is a general resume of the material concerning the appearances of the risen Jesus, reflecting, in particular, traditions found in Luke [24] and John [20].  (Senior 94)  The Gospel ends on . . . the notes of awe and silence and fear, Mark’s . . . way of expressing profound reverence for the events he narrates.  In Jesus’ victory over death, God’s power has transformed the world forever”. (Senior RG 417) 

In awe and silence and in fear . . . the old way comes to an end; the new way begins.

But what is it that has concluded; and what has been instituted?  A church, a way of life, hope, transformation?

Soon we begin Holy Week, the time when we tell and re-tell, live and re-live the story of Jesus’ last days on earth.  We hear the old eyewitness accounts that tell us Jesus has died.  We know that he was buried in a borrowed tomb and that a few days later the tomb is found empty.  Where have the guards gone?  Where are the twelve who were known as the Apostles?  Why is it that only the women return to the tomb to finish the burial rite?

They said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.  It appears to be the end. And yet . . .

I am wondering – as I always do at this time of year – what I would have done had I lived two thousand years ago.  What would I believe?  What would I experience?  Would I see Jesus’ death as the end of something?  Would I see it as the beginning?  Would I be one of those the Resurrected Christ chose to visit?  And if I were to experience this visit . . . would I believe?  And what would I believe?

Each Holy Week as I sit listening and meditating on scripture the same sudden realization always washes over me.  I have been visited by the Resurrected Christ and I have received miracles at his hand.  I have been graced with Jesus’ hope and mercy.  I have been to the tomb to find it empty and I have for a few moments thought that the beautiful truth I believe in is only a sham.

They said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.

And as quickly as that doubt rises it dissolves into nothingness.  All fear is transformed into the warm glow of gratitude and peace.  And I know once again that what appears empty is full, in Christ; what seems lost is gained, in Christ; and what looked like a sad conclusion is, in fact, the beautiful beginning of a new narrative, in Christ.  Let us go out to tell all who will listen the Good News that the end is in truth the beginning . . . in Christ.


A re-post from March 31, 2012.

Image from: http://thewinedarksea.com/index.php/weblog/2010/03/

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.94 & RG 417. Print.   

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: