Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for April 27th, 2020


Monday, April 27, 2020

faithful[1]1 Thessalonians 2: Constancy

During this Eastertide we have spent time reflecting on the hard work of discipleship and how we recognize it in ourselves and others.  We have focused on the qualities of meekness and broken-heartedness and how they bring us strength despite our fear that they might sap our enthusiasm and energy.  Today we begin to examine the quality of constancy, how we see it, where we find it, and why it is so important.

Constancy is more than fidelity; it is steadfastness under duress.  Constancy is more than accuracy and exactness; it is a steady, changeless immutability.  Constancy is not capricious, it is not fickle.  It is stable, consistent and predictable.

Today’s Noontime is a lesson on being constant in our mission here on earth no matter how pleasant or how dire the circumstances.  These verses describe God’s

We look at Paul’s words and phrases and we examine how constant we are in our relationship with God . . .

We drew courage through our God  . . .

Not as trying to please human beings, but rather God, who judges our hearts.

Nor did we seek praise from human beings . . .

We were able to impose our weight as apostles of Christ  . . .

We were gentle among you . . .

We are determined . . .

We proclaimed to you the Gospel of God . . .

You are witnesses and so is God . . .

We too give thanks to God unceasingly . . .

We were all the more eager . . .

For you are our glory and our joy.

In his letters to the people of Thessalonica, Paul addresses the problems that arise when diverse people come together in community, and although these words were written so long ago, we might still use them as a daily guide as we struggle to live a common life from uncommon directions.  How do we remain constant when all we know is taken from us?  How do we maintain steadfast under the duress of betrayal by one who avowed their love?  How do we move on steadily through tumultuous days and dark nights when we have lost our way and see no hope for recovery?

When we read Paul’s epistle to the people of Thessalonica, we discover new wisdom for old problems.  When we offer our suffering with others who have also struggled with loss and fear, we find new courage in old circumstances.  And when we raise our voices with Paul’s closing words in a chorus of gratitude we come upon new strength against old enemies.

So we intone Paul’s words and offer them to heaven in our evening prayer:

Brethren, pray for us.  Greet all the brethren with a holy kiss.  I charge you by the Lord that this epistle be read to all the holy brethren.  The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you.  Amen.  (1 Thessalonians 5:25-28)


Image from: http://dailyexplorationgodis.blogspot.com/

First written on October 13, 2008.  Revised and posted today.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: