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Posts Tagged ‘Jesus is the way’


Romans 10: Disobedient and Contentious People

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

With this Favorite from November 17, 2010, we take a final look at Jesus as the Life we wish to live.

Paul explains here that faith has a way of saving us in a way that the Mosaic Law does not . . . and never will.  It is impossible to reach heaven or to be one with God if we live a life full of checklists that attend to the duties prescribed by a structure.  It is equally impossible to not be saved if we live our lives in Christ . . . if we live a life of acting according the Law of Love . . . even when this Law puts us in danger.

Footnotes explain the references to Old Testament verses, and they also remind us that to speak as Paul does here – or to tell and enact the Gospel story as Paul reminds us we are asked to do – often put us in danger.

In the first century, and in certain parts of the world today, being Christian brings exclusion from the wider society and even the death penalty.  We will need to rely on Christ once we respond to the call to tell the story of salvation.

Among many cliques and groups both now and in Paul’s day, living a life of faith brings scorn and derision.  We will need to rely on Christ once we commit to living a life of fidelity to Jesus’ Way.

In families, work places, schools, and any places where we humans gather, living a life of merciful justice and open trust brings ridicule and disdain.  We will need to rely on Christ once we live as fully in him as he asks.

Paul warns us about all of this today.  The easy, comfortable life spent in and for itself must fall away.  The disciplined life of service that we are called to live is not appealing to rebellious and difficult people. And so we have this clear choice before us: to opt for contention and disobedience, or to choose freedom and salvation in Christ.


Image from: http://lwccyork.com/blog/series/this-is-the-way-of-jesus/ 

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John 14:6: The Life

Thursday, May 31, 2018

We know that Jesus is The Way. We know that Jesus is the Truth. Today we reflect on Jesus as Life, now and eternally.

Jesus answered him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life; no one goes to the Father except by me. (GNT)

What do we know about the life of the next world? Jesus has returned to invite us to join him. The miracle is that even now we might live this life as John testifies to us: This is the testimony in essence: God gave us eternal life; the life is in his Son. (1 John 5:11) If only we might believe in Christ.

Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. (NRSV)

What do we share with others regarding our belief? Jesus assures us that despite what we see around us, all is well. Give your entire attention to what God is doing right now, and don’t get worked up about what may or may not happen tomorrow. God will help you deal with whatever hard things come up when the time comes. (Matthew 6:34) If only we might hope in Christ.

Yeshua said, “I AM the Way — and the Truth and the Life; no one comes to the Father except through me.  (CJB)

How do we behave in the world with others? Jesus reminds us that it is easy to get along with our friends but difficult to relate to our enemies. If you only love the lovable, do you expect a pat on the back? Run-of-the-mill sinners do that. If you only help those who help you, do you expect a medal? Garden-variety sinners do that. If you only give for what you hope to get out of it, do you think that’s charity? The stingiest of pawnbrokers does that. (Luke 6:32) If only we might love in Christ.

Jesus said, “I am the Road, also the Truth, also the Life. No one gets to the Father apart from me. (MSG)

How do we represent Christ and his gift of Life to the world? Jesus calls us to work in the vineyard of his love. What a huge harvest! And how few the harvest hands. So on your knees; ask the God of the Harvest to send harvest hands. (Luke 10:2) If only we might act in Christ.

God is among us, bringing the joy of resurrection to all who will listen. Jesus is with us, healing and calling. The Spirit is upon us, offering the only life that matters, Life in Christ.

When we compare varying translations of these verses, we experience the light and truth in this message. We find The Way. 


Images from: https://www.biblestudytools.com/bible-stories/the-resurrection-of-jesus-bible-story.html 

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Saturday, January 21, 2012 – Jeremiah 45 – Weary from Groaning

From Psalm 6, we hear a plaint from one who is weary from groaning, whose life has become a living hell.

A scribe

Do not reprove me in your anger, Lord, nor punish me in your wrath.  Have pity on me for I am weak; heal me, Lord, for my bones are trembling.  In utter terror is my soul – and you, Lord, how long . . . ?  Turn, Lord, save my life; in your mercy rescue me.  For who among the dead remembers you? Who praises you in Sheol? I am weary from sighing; all night long my tears drench my bed; my couch is soaked with weeping.  My eyes are dimmed with sorrow, worn out because all of my foes.  (Psalm 6:1-7)

In the HARPERCOLLINS BIBLE DICTIONARY Sheol is described as a biblical term for the netherworld and even, in Isaiah 5:14, a reference to a power that can destroy the living.  Sheol is another word for Hades; it is a place where departed spirits live (Proverbs 9:18).  It may also be the deepest depths of the earth (Deuteronomy 32:22 and Amos 9:2) where there is no light, no joy, and no hope.  (Achetemeier 1011)  In Sheol there is only darkness and terror; and some of us have been there . . . and back.

How do we humans climb out of the miry cistern in which we sometimes find ourselves?  What do we do to calm inner terror even though we manage to dry outward tears?  How is it possible for us to experience the happiness and warmth of a life lived in faith when all possibility of rescue seems gone?  What do we do to stop the chattering of trembling bones and chase away our too many foes?  How do we sleep on a bed that is drenched from our weeping? 

Jeremiah is a Book we will want to open when we find ourselves overcome with grief.  His prophecy is one that speaks to those who have visited the depths of despair or who are even beyond the place where all hope is abandoned.  Today we are told that Jeremiah’s words were recorded by his secretary Baruch and we might wonder why the prophet wishes to terrify us.  When we reflect further we know that Jeremiah’s real message is not fear; rather, it is this: with God there is hope for the hopeless, there is gain for those who have lost all, there is rescue for the weary, and there is planting where before there was only uprooting  . . .

Jeremiah’s life and prophecy, we are told, require “us to face up more directly to the impediments and barriers along the way than to bask in the complete light at the end of the way . . . God intends prophecy to guide us through the path of human, emotional reactions, not round about them.  If we transfer this approach into New Testament thought, Jesus is ‘the way and the truth and the life’ (Jn 14,6) – therefore, as much the way through human life as its destination, as much the truth that gradually emerges along the way forward as its definitive statement, as much life in its stages of growth as it is life bearing fruit t harvest (Mt 4,26-29) . . . Jeremiah does not allow us to detour round a difficulty.  Persons gifted with keen, sensitive emotions, and thoroughly involved in their work and message, do not normally avoid the excesses of these virtues!  They plunge straight ahead”.  (Senior RG 305-306) 

Jeremiah speaks his words to us today through his faithful secretary Baruch.  When we feel ourselves sinking into the profundity of his muddy cistern, when our bed is drenched from our weeping, when we are weary from all of our groaning . . . let us plunge straight ahead and move toward God, singing as the psalmist sings:

Away from me, all who do evil!  The Lord has heard my weeping.  The Lord has heard my prayer; the Lord takes up my plea.  My foes will be terrified and disgraced; all will fall back in sudden shame.  (Psalm 6:8-10)

Achetemeier, Paul J. HARPERCOLLINS BIBLE DICTIONARY. 2nd edition. San Francisco: Harper San Francisco, 1996. 1011. Print.  

For more on the Book of Jeremiah see the page on this blog: Jeremiah – Person and Mesage

For more information on Jewish scribes, click the images above or go to: http://www.mmiweb.org.uk/gcsere/revision/judaism/people/importantpeople.html or http://www.alljewishlinks.com/steps-to-becoming-a-jewish-scribe/

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