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Posts Tagged ‘Romans 12’


Jeremiah 18:18-23: A Prayer for Revenge

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Yesterday we considered the words of Jeremiah and how a marvelous inversion takes place when we allow God to move in our lives.  The sorrow of the Good Friday grace becomes the Easter joy of new life.  Today we share with you a reflection written on February 16, 2008.  It is Jesus’ call to a new kind of life, a life of turning the other cheek, a life of intercession for our enemies.

My mother was so wise.  Her mantra was: Kill your enemies with prayer.  Kill them with kindness.  Her words have always served me so well.  Today as we let the poetry of these lines filter through us, we can also look at the words of the one who fulfilled this prophecy of Jeremiah.  The words of Christ brought to us in Matthew’s Gospel . . . which happens to be the Gospel reading for today’s Mass.

Jeremiah: Heed me, O Lord, and listen to what my adversaries say. 

Jesus: You have heard that it was said, You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy. 

Jeremiah: Must good be repaid with evil that they should dig a pit to take my life?

Jesus: But I say to you, love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your heavenly Father, for he makes his sun rise on the bad and the good, and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust.

Jeremiah: Forgive not their crime, blot not out their sin in your sight!

Jesus: For if you love those who love you, what recompense will you have?  . . .  And if you greet your brothers and sisters only, what is unusual about that?  Do not the pagans do the same?

Jeremiah: For they have dug a pit to capture me, they have hid snares at my feet; but you, O Lord, know all their plans to slay me. 

Jesus: So be perfect, just as your heavenly father is perfect.

This perfection which Jesus speaks of is the New Law which fulfills the old Mosaic Law.  It is the perfection which Paul describes in 1 Corinthians chapter 13 . . . it is Love . . . patient, kind, enduring, bearing all things, longing for unity and not separation.

Today’s Morning Prayer in MAGNIFICAT gives us more to reflect on from Romans 12: Bless those who persecute [you], bless and do not curse them.  Do not repay anyone with evil for evil; be concerned for what is noble in the sight of all.

The MAGNIFICAT Morning Intercessions lead us to intercede for those who hurt us most . . .

Let us pray for those with whom we do not live in peace; asking God through the intercession of Mary:

Grant them every blessing, Lord.

For those who have hurt or harmed us. Grant them every blessing, Lord.

For those who dislike us. Grant them every blessing, Lord.

For those who look down on us. Grant them every blessing, Lord.

For those who refuse to speak to us. Grant them every blessing, Lord.

Amen.


A re-post from April 23, 2012 .

Cameron, Peter John. “Prayer for the Morning.” MAGNIFICAT. 2.16(2008). Print.

For more insight about killing our enemies with insight, click on the image above or visit The Daily Awe.com at: http://www.thedailyawe.com/2010/10/kill-them-with-kindness/

For more on the book of Jeremiah, go to the Jeremiah – Person and Message page on this blog.

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god listensTuesday, November 4, 2014

Psalm 66

Praise of Goodness

But truly God has listened . . .

There are so many times when we feel as though we are abandoned or that our petitions go unattended; yet we cannot know or understand the mind of God.  This psalm is divided into two distinct sections: thanks for God’s power that has saved the nation, and an individual vow to thank God in a liturgical rite.  The entire psalm focuses us on the necessity of thanking God properly because he has arrived as our savior – a foreshadowing of Jesus’ human presence among us.  Footnotes connect us with Paul’s letter to the Romans 12:1 and 6:5-8 in which we read that we are to present ourselves as living sacrifices before God, just as Christ has done for us.  (THE PSALMS 165)  The psalmist here does not complain of the difficulties suffered; rather, he sees them as part of a required rite of passage, as a stage in his discipleship, as a badge of honor.

But truly God has listened . . .

Giving thanks – even for the difficulties we have just undergone – is our appropriate stance in all things.  Paul reminds us through the Thessalonians, give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Jesus Christ.  Do not put out the spirit’s fire; do not treat prophecies with contempt.  Test everything.  Hold onto the good.  Avoid every kind of evil.  May God himself, the God of peace, sanctify you through and through.  May your whole spirit, soul and body kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.  The one who calls you is faithful and he will do it.  (1 Thessalonians 5:18-24)

It is not until a storm has been safely weathered that we can see where we have arrived.  It is not until we have lost what we thought was ours that we understand what we fully have.  It is not until we suffer that we become wholly understanding of the force of goodness; and it is not until we experience evil that we altogether understand the necessity for and the magnitude of God’s goodness in the world.  While we are undergoing trial we can barely breathe and we can think of nothing but survival; but after crisis mode, we must always re-set our markers and look carefully at our new surroundings . . . otherwise we might miss the fact that truly God has listened . . .

THE PSALMS, NEW CATHOLIC VERSION. Saint Joseph Edition. New Jersey: Catholic Book Publishing Company, 2004. 165. Print.

A Favorite written on October 30, 2009. 

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