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Posts Tagged ‘common good’


Isaiah 22:15-25: Denunciation

Domenico Fetti: The Parable of the Mote and the Beam

Saturday, March 17, 2018

Adapted from a Favorite written on September 11, 2009.

At times we are called to rebuke one another.  At times we are rebuked by our sisters and brothers.  Most of us steer clear of conflict when we can.  Some of us relish conflict; it gives us a place to hide from our own troubles.  Others do not like conflict but engage in it when they feel they must, answering God’s calls to a particular place or person.  Today we read about people being denounced for their dishonesty.  This is a familiar portion of Isaiah often referenced as Jesus gathers the lost sheep lead astray by corrupt leaders.

There is a huge difference between self-examination and seeking self.  In today’s Gospel Jesus makes this clear to us as he tells the parable of the blind leading the blind.  In this story he asks us to look at the splinter of wood in our neighbor’s eye after we remove the beam from our own (Luke 6:39-42).  He calls us to the difficult task of opening our hearts for healing, of making ourselves available for discipleship, of looking out for the common good before our own.

We always seem to forget that we need not fuss about all that is around us when we first make room in each day for Christ to enter into our thoughts and actions.  Some of us, because we put the world first, are like pegs fastened in secure places but still are cut down and perish.  We believe we have everything in place to ensure our happiness at the expense of others yet even as we close ourselves off to hoard our dreams, we set ourselves up for denunciation.  When we enter into or avoid conflict based on our own comfort levels, we set ourselves up for denunciation.  When we begin and end each day without Christ, we set ourselves up for denunciation.  When we make each day’s journey without dedicating all we do to Christ, we set ourselves up for denunciation

So rather than seek our own ease, rather than look at other people’s splinters, we must look to our perspectives, motivations and actions.  These beams we remove from our own eyes will tell us if we are setting ourselves up for denunciation.  And after reading Isaiah, this is an understanding we will want to gain. It is action we will want to take. It is love we will want to share.

Image from: https://www.thecatholicthing.org/2017/08/03/splinters-beams-and-clear-sight%E2%80%A8%E2%80%A8/

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Hebrews 13: Pleasing God

Tuesday, April 12, 2016Angels-Artwork-Christmas

The writer of this letter has so much common-sense advice for us.

Stay on good terms with each other, held together by love. Be ready with a meal or a bed when it’s needed. Why, some have extended hospitality to angels without ever knowing it!  (verses 1-2)

The writer of this letter has so much good news for us.

Don’t be obsessed with getting more material things. Be relaxed with what you have. (verse 5)

The writer of this letter has solid cautions for us.

Don’t be lured away from Jesus by the latest speculations about him. The grace of Christ is the only good ground for life. Products named after Christ don’t seem to do much for those who buy them. (verse 9)

The writer of this letter has practical advice for us.

Make sure you don’t take things for granted and go slack in working for the common good; share what you have with others. (verse 16)

The writer of this letter opens up God’s vision for us.

Friends, please take what I’ve written most seriously. I’ve kept this as brief as possible; I haven’t piled on a lot of extras. (verse 22)

The writer of this letter reminds us of all that is important.

shlach_lecha_640x360Grace be with you, every one. (Verse 25)

The writer of this letter deserves a bit of our time today as he tells us how easy it is to please our loving God. When we use the scripture link to compare different translations of these words, we draw closer to God, and we invite waiting angels into our hearts and homes.

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