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Posts Tagged ‘healing’


Thursday, August 13, 2020

Angels_Unawares-Heb13-2[1]Hebrews 13:2

Unknowingly

Do not neglect hospitality, for through it some have unknowingly entertained angels. 

We love these stories of God’s messengers, these special beings who come to us to share important information . . . if we only have ears to listen.  If only we pause. If only we look.

God says: So often my messengers return to me and say, “There was so much going on in his head that he just could not hear my voice”. And I reply, “Go again. He will hear you when he is ready. He still has nimble explanations for his circumstances. We cannot give up on him.  We must persist”. Sometimes my angels return to tell me, “She is too disbelieving. I stood before her and she walked right past me.  I spoke, but she did not give me the least bit of time”.  Again I reply, “Go again. She will hear you one of these days.  She has not yet come to the end of her hope. We cannot give up on her.  We must persist”. These reports are painful for us but still we persevere.  More often my angels tell me, “She was so grateful for your word!  She hung on every nuance and asked good questions”. Or they return to say, “He was desperate for your word. I had to repeat the information several times until he began to understand”. These are the reports that are easiest to hear and that bring us most joy. Yet, we endure with those in difficult circumstance because every lamb is important to me. No matter how lost. No matter how closed in. No matter how unbelieving. 

AngelsEarth[1]We are so pressed for time, so un-used to believing, so immune to good acts and decent works that we unknowingly reject or pass by the very help that we seek. It is never too late to believe. It is never too late to apologize. It is never too late to change. God holds all the words we ever need. And God often sends these words to us on the swift wings of angels. Let us not miss them.


Enter the word angel in the blog search bar and explore other reflections.

Use a Bible Concordance to examine the number of times in Scripture that angels deliver messages in the stories we so often hear.  Note how often these angels are received, and how often they bring help, healing and hope.

Image from: http://www.gildedquillonline.com/products-1-37.html and http://www.forwardchristian.net/christianity-101/angels.html

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Friday, July 31, 2020

God-purpose-revival[1]Isaiah 57:15

Revival

For thus says he who is high and exalted, living eternally, whose name is the Holy One: On high I dwell, and in holiness, and with the crushed and dejected in spirit, to revive the spirits of the dejected, to revive the hearts of the crushed. 

We are accustomed to thinking of the high and exalted as above all who are weary and disheartened from the stress of their labor.  We usually think of rulers as those who set themselves apart from the common masses.  Our societies today reflect this thinking. Isaiah conveys comforting words from the One who is Lord of all to those who are afflicted.

God says: Isaiah tells you that I live on high and this is true; yet I dwell with you.  I raise you up to live in me.  Isaiah also tells you that I live with you who are crushed and weary; and this is also true.  My favorite dwelling is with those who have no hope.  Do you see the inversion that I bring to you?  I live with those who are rejected and lowly, and raise them up.  I revive those who have a darkened spirit.  I live through those with a tired heart. My shoulders are broad and my spirit willing; my heart encompasses the universe; I am eternal.  And it is to this eternity, this holiness, this revival that I carry you.  Allow me to heal all that weighs you down.

This is no false promise.  God always reverses what we humans see as the natural order and God wants to transform weary hearts into hearts afire with eternal love.


Enter the words inversion or God’s heart into the blog search bar and continue to explore.

Image from: http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/thabitianyabwile/2013/07/23/are-you-the-kind-of-person-god-uses-for-revival/ 

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Thursday, June 18, 2020

Biliverti: The Archangel Raphael Refusing Tobias' Gift

Giovanni Biliverti: The Archangel Raphael Refusing Tobias’ Gift

Tobit 12

Raphael Makes Himself Known

This beautiful story comes to us today to remind us that we need to make known the many small miracles we receive from God.  Each time God inverts a plot, we must share the story.  Each time God saves us from our own fears we must tell the good news.  Each time God heals a wounded heart we must make God’s goodness known.

We have read this story before but today we find something new.

Verse 6: Raphael called the two men aside privately and said to them: “Thank God! Give him the praise and glory.  Before all the living, acknowledge the many good things he has done for you, by blessing and extolling his name in song.  Honor and praise God’s deeds and do not be slack in praising him”.

The healing hand of God manifests itself frequently in our lives through strangers.  When Tobit and Tobias wish to give a monetary reward to Tobias’ traveling companion for all the healing he has done in their lives, the Archangel Raphael reveals himself . . . and rather than take payment, asks them to praise God who has answered their cry for help and has rescued them.

Verse 10: But those habitually guilty of sin are their own worst enemies.

We are reminded that when we sin, we are separating ourselves from God and hurting ourselves.  The first step toward healing is recognizing that we are human and imperfect . . . and acknowledging that God is all and that God alone is enough.

Verse 14: . . . and now the Lord has sent me to heal you.

We can heal one another and in so doing also heal ourselves . . . and act as co-redeemers of the human race with Christ.  For we are adopted daughters and sons of God.

Verses 17 and 18: And Raphael said to them: “No need to fear.  You are safe.  Thank God now and forever.  As for me, when I came to you it was not out of any favor on my part, but because it was God’s will.  So continue to thank him every day; praise him with song”. 

Fear not . . . these are the same healing words which Jesus speaks.

Verse 22: They kept thanking God and singing his praises; and they continued to acknowledge these marvelous deeds which he had done when the angel of God appeared to them.

Let us proclaim all God’s wonderful works for God has sent angels to minister to us even though we might not see them.  Let us tell everyone we know the stories of our own healing for these are miracles performed for us by a loving God.  And let us remember to thank God for all that God does to heal us of all that limits us.


For more about Raphael, Tobit or Tobias, enter their names in the blog search bar and reflect on the gift of this story.

Adapted from a reflection written on January 2, 2008.

Image from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Biliverti

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Easter Friday, April 17, 2020

Isaiah 62:1-2: I will not be silent . . .

Edmunde Burke: 1729-1797

During this Eastertide we have celebrated our rescue from the depths.  We have praised God for the goodness and mercy shown to us.  We have spent time with the stories that so vividly tell us of God’s love for us.  Today we reflect on our response.  Do we sing out in gratitude . . . or do we remain silent?

We will always find imperfection in the relationships with our loved ones.  This one refuses to see common sense.  That one continues to repeat a cycle of failure.  Despite all of this . . . we must remember to ask God for more patience.  And we must not remain silent.

We will always find obstacles when we interact with our neighbors or our work colleagues.  This one is recalcitrant.  That one is toxic.  Despite all of this . . . we must remember to ask God for more wisdom.  And we must not remain silent.

We will always have a different perspective on life from members in our worship community, from those who actively lead us in civic life.  This one is deceitful.  That one is too simpering.  The other is too strident.  Still the other lacks compassion or common sense.  Despite all of this . . . we must remember to ask God for more prudence.  And we must not remain silent.

We will always suffer sorrow.  We will always experience strife.  No one is immune from life’s whimsical turnings.  Each of us will have need to call on God for clarity and support.  Each of us will need to heft some of our burden onto Christ’s broad shoulders.  There is a guarantee that each of us will want to hide in the hug of God’s embrace.  None of us is exempt from life’s brutal surprises.

God knows all before we dream it.  Christ walks with each of us although we might not believe it.  The Spirit dwells within us to abide with us through our sorrows and joys.  No one is immune from this promise.  No one is exempt from this truth.

We have experienced the transformation of Easter.  We are loved and protected by God; we are touched and held by Christ; and we are consoled and counseled by the Spirit.  So let us be patient.  Let us be wise.  Let us be prudent.  Let us be grateful.  Let us be loving.  And above all . . . let us tell the world about God’s immense care and love for us.   Let us never forget to tell this good news.  Let us always remember to give thanks . . . for we must never, not ever, remain silent.


“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” Edmund Burke, an Irish statesman who stood in support for the colonists in the American Revolution.

To read more about Burke, click on the image above or go to: http://www.padfield.com/1997/goodmen.html or http://www.historyguide.org/intellect/burke.html

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Friday, February 7, 2020

Psalm 101: Integrity and Possibility

00387775[1]I sing of love and justice; to you, Lord, I sing praise.  I follow the way of integrity; when will you come to me?

This is one of my favorite psalms, written as a song of the Just Ruler.

I act with integrity of heart within my royal court.

My royal court . . . my family, my house, my workplace, my colleagues, the circle of my temple which accompanies everywhere at all times.

I do not allow into my presence anyone who speaks perversely.

This, of course, is the Old Testament, separatist way of dealing with deceit.  Yet even David and Solomon had their defects.  And Jesus said, Let the one who is without sin cast the first stone . . .  We are New Testament people and so we must not turn away from the struggle of humanity.  We must act to heal, to transform, to save.

Whoever acts shamefully I hate; no such person can be my friend.  I shun the devious of heart; the wicked I do not tolerate.

“Hate” is such a strong word.  And as New Testament Faithful, we are called to love our enemies into goodness.  Jesus waded among the sinners to bring them healing.  Today we, sinners all, wade among the craziness of the world to bring Jesus the Healer to all.  This is how we heal ourselves.

Whoever slanders another in secret I reduce to silence.

When the craziness is too much to handle, we retreat in Christ to look for answers.

Haughty eyes and arrogant hearts I cannot endure.

Hubris, indifference, greed, envy, fear . . . these all lead to arrogance.  We are to witness to Truth, Light, Humility.  We are to act these virtues.

I look to the faithful of the land; they alone can be my companions.  Those who follow the way of integrity, they alone can enter my service.

There are always faithful surrounding us . . . even though we often feel alone.  We must seek them out.  We must gather around us the faithful who want to share the journey home.

No one who practices deceit can hold a post in my court.

We must use prudence when we walk among those who live in the shadows and call them to the light . . . we must not despair that our work has no effect.

No one who speaks falsely can be among my advisors.  Each morning I clear the wicked from the land, and rid the Lord’s city of all evildoers.

We must not believe that there is no hope.  This was the sin of Judas, the man who betrayed Jesus.  He was “neither a master of evil nor the figure of a demoniacal power of darkness but rather a sycophant who bows down before the anonymous power of changing moods and current fashion”.  (Cameron 72)

“Judas and Peter both betrayed the One whose bread they had taken.  The difference between them was that Peter loved and repented; Judas despaired.  The Lord, risen, would have repaid them both with his forgiving love.  Judas could not even imagine the possibility”.  (Cameron 66)

And so we pray,

Let us not despair when we see a lack of integrity.  Let us, like Christ, be the Hope that all may be made anew.  Let us live in this Hope, in this Possibility that we all will be transformed by the healing presence of Christ . . . the Presence which we bring to the world through our own actions.  Let us believe that all sin is forgiven, no matter how grave.  Let us love those who languish, who plot, who live out indifferent lives.  Let us love them into transformed lives of integrity . . . of possibility . . . so that the words we say and the creeds we believe . . . match the actions of our hands . . . and the openness and fullness of our hearts.  Amen.


Cameron, Peter John. MAGNIFICAT. 19.3 (2008): 66 and 72. Print.  

First written on March 19, 2008.  Re-written and posted today as a Favorite.

Image from: http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/clsr/campaign-integrity

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Saturday, January 25, 2013

2 Kings 5: The Cure of Naaman

Pieter de Grebber: Elisha Refusing the Gifts of Naaman

Pieter de Grebber: Elisha Refusing the Gifts of Naaman

Naaman is cured of leprosy not by his faith alone but through the faith and encouragement of a small child who believes in Yahweh and the power of his prophets.  It is worth our while to read this story and examine commentary and footnotes because once we do – and this may seem unbelievable – we will find that we have a greater understanding of the modern world we live in today.

Through the child in this story we see that prophets are not the only ones among us who are called to heal, cure and serve as instruments for miracles. We see that we are also called to heal one another either with the direct laying on of hands, or by our intercessory prayers.

Jesus tells us in a very clear way that we must pray for our enemies: You have heard it said, “Love your neighbor and hate your enemy”.  But I tell you: Love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you . . . If you love those who love you, what reward will you get?  Are not even the tax collectors doing that?  And if you greet only your brothers, what are you doing more than others? Do not even pagans do that?  (Matthew 5: 43-47)

Christ constantly presents us with a world of inversion. We die in order to be born; we give in order to receive; we sit at the lowest seat in order to be called higher; we humble ourselves so that we might be exalted.  The examples Jesus gives us are endless.   Today we hear God’s urging to heal others, even those who harm us, so that we in turn are healed.

I believe that we are called to be healers, even when wounded ourselves, because the prayers of a victim rise ever so quickly to God’s altar. God, in all of his compassion and mercy and desire to love, will reward the prayer of one who is wounded who – like God – forgives and then petitions healing for the abuser.

We must be present in spirit to our fellow pilgrims, and when we wade into the river of forgiveness, just as Naaman enters the river Jordan, we will find that the our willingness to intercede for our enemies will wash away the things of this world.  Suddenly we find ourselves present to the Spirit. And just as suddenly we will know that we, like Naaman, will “know that there is no God in all the earth, except in Israel.”  This one God, this Yahweh, sent his son to heal us and ransom us from our dark place.   It is this God who calls us to heal one another . . . so that we in turn may be healed.


First written on May 31, 2007.  Re-written and posted today as a Favorite. 

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Monday, January 6, 2020

Matthew 9:35-38: The Compassion of Jesus

sheep-with-shepherd[1]A year ago we looked at these verses and today they pop up again. When familiar scripture returns we have the opportunity to look a bit deeper – and today is no exception.  A year ago we looked at the meaning of Epiphany, the state of being surprised by something we already know but have not yet acknowledged.  Today we fast forward to watch Jesus at work among the crowds who throng to him now that the word has spread about his healing goodness.  When we look more closely at these few short verses, where is the epiphany for us?  Where is the surprise?

What is it that moves Jesus to grow into one who heals the blind, deaf, mute and diseased? At the sight of the crowds . . .

When is it that we see Jesus in our own lives?  When is he beside us on the bus or train? When does he ride in the back seat of the car?  When does he work in the cubicle down the row?  When does he stand in the grocery line with us?   At the sight of the crowds, his heart was moved with pity for them . . .

Why is it that Jesus continually forgives, consistently shows mercy and always delivers justice?  Why do we shrink from his offer of relationship when we are rejected by others?  Why do we turn away from the source of all goodness when we are distressed? At the sight of the crowds, his heart was moved with pity for them because they were troubled and abandoned . . .

How is it that God walks among us healing constantly, consoling always and touching our lives with many small miracles and we do not see?  At the sight of the crowds, his heart was moved with pity for them because they were troubled and abandoned, like sheep without a shepherd. 

Jesus comes to us to mend and console.  This is not surprising when we read his story.  This is no Epiphany.

God gives us the choice to follow or reject Christ.  This is not surprising when we consider how much God loves us.  Neither is this is an Epiphany.

The Spirit accompanies and protects us at all times.  This is not surprising when we remember the promise of the cross.  Not even this is an Epiphany when we know the Gospel story.

At the sight of the crowds . . . We are only one in a crowd of billions and yet God knows our smallest needs and greatest hopes.  Perhaps this is our Epiphany.  God so loves us that he sends his only child into the world to retrieve and shepherd us.  Christ so loves us that he is willing to redeem us.  Christ’s compassion knows no bounds . . . so let us then respond to God’s call with our own Epiphany.  Let us surprise ourselves . . . and follow willingly.


A re-post from January 6, 2013.

To read an interesting blog post on what it means to be Sheep, click on the image above or go to: http://tndickersondiaries.blogspot.com/2011/02/and-we-think-were-so-smart.html

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Hosea 3: Triumph of Love

Saturday, December 14, 2019

“Hosea was instructed to take Gomer back, redeeming her from her paramours.  On condition of her amendment, she will be restored to her former position of wife.  This in turn signifies God’s enduring love for his people.  He will put the people through a period of trial – the dissolution of the kingdom – in order that they may return to him wholeheartedly”.  (Senior 1111)

So he bought her for fifteen pieces of silver and about ten and a half bushels of barley.  Then he said to her . . . “I in turn will wait for you”.

It is only a fully good and gracious God who can take back one who has sunk so low as to have given herself to swine.

It is only a faithful and patient God who can take back one who has scoffed and scorned a love fully and freely given.

It is only a hopeful and healing God who can redeem and restore one who has sinned so egregiously.

We shall come trembling to the Lord and to his bounty . . .

We shall be like grains of sand of the sea, which can neither be measured or counted . . .

We shall be called “Children of the Living God” . . .

We shall be gathered together . . .

We shall become Jezreel, or “God sows” . . .

We shall say to our sisters and brothers, Ammi,” or “my people” . . .

We shall say to our sisters, “Ruhama,” or “she is pitied” . . .

We shall experience the triumph of love . . . and we shall be restored. 


Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.1111. Print.   

Written on October 27, 2010 and posted today as a Favorite.

To read more about Gomer and her children – and her remarkable marriage to the prophet Hosea – click on the image above or go to: http://www.netplaces.com/women-of-the-bible/temptresses-harlots-and-sinful-women/gomer.htm

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Rembrandt: Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Jerusalem

Jeremiah 39:15-18: A Gesture of Comfort

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Even among the twists and turns in the tangled web of intrigue which surround Jeremiah’s life, this prophet remains true to his God.  Both his words and actions reveal his total devotion to the Lord, and his life – like the flight of a well-aimed arrow – arcs through turbulent history to blaze a path as safe passageway for the faithful to follow.  No one, after reading this man’s story, can say that their burden is too weighty to carry.  Anyone can see – from Jeremiah’s story – that tragedy and loss are not always a bad thing.  We frequently find redemption in the ashes of failure.  But we must be open to the belief that all is possible through God.  We must demonstrate trust.

Today finds us at a point in Jeremiah’s story where he is rewarded by the invaders for maintaining his fidelity to God.  In the midst of horror comes a gesture of comfort.  Horrible events spin around Jeremiah.  The king and his sons have been captured by Nebuchadnezzar’s troops.  Zedekiah’s eyes have been put out, his sons have been executed.  The palace has been burned; the walls of the city are demolished; the deportation to Babylon has begun.  Jeremiah will be given permission to live where he likes – with the exiled or with the remnant.  A time of respite is upon him.

We do not know precisely where or how or when Jeremiah eventually dies; but one thing we know for certain is that he will remain as true to his God in his end days as we see him today.  Jeremiah will be rescued as he is always rescued.

Although there are times when we sit in the mud of the cistern of life, we too, are always rescued.  A word of comfort pierces the darkness.  A gesture of healing staunches a bleeding wound.  The sign of peace arrives at our door.  We know we are blessed.

In these graced moments amid life’s battles, we might pause to give thanks for such a healing and loving God.  All God asks in payment is our trust.


Written on October 20, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

For more on this prophet and his prophecy, see the Jeremiah – Person and Message page on this blog at: https://thenoontimes.com/the-book-of-our-life/the-old-testament/the-prophets/jeremiah-person-and-message/

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