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Posts Tagged ‘eternity’


Proverbs 22 to 24: Infinity is Us

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Escher: Approaches to Infinity

Once I begin to read these verses, I cannot stop.  They ring as true today as when they were written so long ago.  They are proof that human nature, like water, swirls to the lowest level if left unchecked; but if effort is spent, water can be managed into refreshing spray, into nurturing irrigation channels.  Water can both destroy and mend.  So too, can humans.

The shrewd man perceives evil and hides, while simpletons continue on and suffer the penalty . . . Be not friendly with a hot-headed man, nor the companion of a wrathful man, lest you learn his ways, and get yourself into a snare . . . Look not on the wine when it is read, when it sparkles in the glass.  It goes down smoothly, but in the end it bites like a serpent, or like a poisonous adder.  Your eyes behold strange sites, and your heart utters disordered thoughts . . .

Some things never change.

If you remain indifferent in time of adversity, your strength will depart from you . . . Lie not in wait  against the home of a just man, ravage not his dwelling place; for the just man falls seven times and rises again, but the wicked stumble to ruin . . . Be not provoked with evildoers, nor envious of the wicked; for the evil man has no future, the lamp of the wicked will be put out. 

Some people never change.

He who plots evil – men call him an intriguer.  Beyond intrigue and folly and sin, it is arrogance that men find abominable.

Proverbs are a fountain of strength because we can find sayings that suit all people and occasions.  As I read, the images of many people flood my mind.  Images of myself also come to me – both from good times and from bad.

These are universal sentiments for all people for all times.  On a hot summer evening we do well to pause . . . read . . . listen, watch and pray.


Written on June 12, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

Image from: http://f06.middlebury.edu/FYSE1176A/Escher.htm

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1 Kings 20: Victory

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Ahab is an unscrupulous leader who does anything to gain advantage, and today we watch him violate a ban on war – an action for which he will later pay with his life.  In Chapter 21 is the famous story of his seizure of Naboth’s vineyard.  In Chapter 22 he will die in battle.  Ben-hadad, one of several men of this name in the Old Testament, attacks Samaria several times, is victorious once, but more frequently suffers defeat.

Reading through the ups and downs of the fortunes of individual men, we see a picture that is much like our own lives. Things go well for a while among nations, and then they sour.  Leaders agree in principle to a concept, later they back away.  Promises once looked to for hopeful solutions to grave problems become lost in pride and greed.

We might become caught up in the drama and tragedy of lives spent so quickly and thoughtlessly. 

We might become despondent when we watch good ideas wither from neglect.

We might become pessimistic or even cynical when we see goodness overtaken by evil. 

We might become hopeless as we witness continual injustice.

This will happen when we see as humans see . . . and this will not happen when we see as God sees.

Thomas Matthews Rooke: Elijah Prophesises to Ahab and Jezebel their End

When we see as humans see, we take today’s story and see a series of military and political victories and losses.  When we see as God sees we are cognizant of the many lives caught up in the machine of battle in which leaders engage coolly, moving war equipment and troops as if they were pieces on a chessboard.

When we see as humans see, we regard each day as a series of battles to be fought and won: getting to work on time through traffic, battling with colleagues for agendas, making certain that our perspective is the one seen by friends or colleagues.

When we see as God sees, we regard each day as a gift through which we experience many interchanges with family, friends, colleagues, and even strangers.  We see the wisdom in coming to consensus, of standing in solidarity, of witnessing to injustice and of handing over our problems to God.  These are the victories that nourish.  These are the victories that give life.

When we see as humans see, time and location are often stumbling blocks.  When we see as God sees, they are gifts to be received, shared and returned in gratitude to the one who gives us life.  These are the many small victories that build up as our treasure.  These are the victories that cannot be taken away, that cannot be reversed.  These are the victories that will last an eternity.

A Favorite from December 20, 2009.

For more images by Thomas Matthews Rooke of the Ahab, Jezebel, Naboth and ELijah stories, visit: https://artuk.org/discover/artists/rooke-thomas-matthews-18421942

To learn more about Ahab, visit: http://biblehub.com/topical/a/ahab.htm 

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1 Peter 1:3-9: A Living Hope

Third Sunday of Easter, April 30, 2017

Peter Denies Christ
John 18

As we enter into the third week of Eastertide, we look to Peter, Jesus’ companion who denied knowing him (John 18); and who later pledged to the resurrected Christ that he would feed and love his sheep (John 21). We are those sheep and today we listen to Peter’s words.

What a God we have! Because Jesus was raised from the dead, we’ve been given a brand-new life and have everything to live for, including a future in heaven—and the future starts now! 

As we move through our days and nights, this is good news. In our typically linear way of thinking, the past, present and future are separate entities that we cannot manipulate; yet Peter tells us that Jesus has changed the natural order of time. Past, present and future fuse into an eternal timelessness, an infinite oneness, an unending union. And we are invited to participate in this union.

The Day is coming when you’ll have it all—life healed and whole. I know how great this makes you feel, even though you have to put up with every kind of aggravation in the meantime.

As we look at our lives and our surrounding circumstances, these are joyful words. In our consumption and status driven world, the powerful hold sway over the poor, sickness opposes good health, and death overcomes life; yet Peter reminds us of the many miracles that erase the demarcation between wholeness and weakness.

You never saw him, yet you love him. You still don’t see him, yet you trust him—with laughter and singing. Because you kept on believing, you’ll get what you’re looking forward to: total salvation.

James Tissot: Feed My Lambs
John 21

As we anticipate the fulfillment of God’s promise, the serenity of Jesus’ Good News, and perfect union with and in the healing of the Spirit, we find Peter’s words reassuring. In the rush of our days, we pause to reflect on the healing power of Peter’s testimony. From one who once renounced the Living God, we hear the miracle of his conversion. And we turn from our anxieties and fears to the assurance of this Living Hope.

The verses cited above are from THE MESSAGE. To compare these words with those in other translations, use the scripture link and the drop-down menus to explore Peter’s message of A Living Hope to us.

Tomorrow, the first of Peter’s sermons following Pentecost.

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