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Posts Tagged ‘John Henry Newman’


John 17:20-21: Jesus Prays

Thursday, May 30, 2019

This feels so intimate when I read it that I feel as though I ought to tip toe quietly, backward out of the room, closing the door gently so that the snick of the bolt as it moves into the socket does not disturb Jesus as he prays to the father.  But I do not.  I remain and kneel, hoping that my tiny prayer might join with such a huge one.  And of course, it does.

God is wondrous.  God is good.  God is all there is.  There is nothing more.

We are in a world of mystery, with one bright light before us, sufficient for our proceeding forward through all difficulties.  Take away this light and we are utterly retched – we know not where we are, how we are sustained, what will become of us, and all that is dear to us, what we are to believe, and why we are in being.  But with we have all and abound. . . what is more elevating and transporting, than the generosity of heart which risks everything on God’s word, dares the powers of evil to their worst efforts, and repels the illusions of sense and the artifices of reason, by confidence in the truth of him who has ascended to the right hand of the Majesty on high . . . On Him we venture our all; we can bear thankfully to put ourselves into his hands, our interests present and eternal, and the interests of all we love.  John Henry Newman – MAGNIFICAT MEDITATION OF THE DAY

On him we can venture all.  Him we can trust.  Him we can fully thank with open and vulnerable heart, with open and willing hands.

God is wondrous.  God is good.  God is all there is.  There is nothing more.


A re-post from May 16, 2012.

Image from: http://beautifuldayrev.blogspot.com/2012/03/stay-awake-prayer-in-garden.html

Cameron, Peter John. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 5.1 (2008). Print.

Written on May 1, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

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John 8:31-59: Seeing God in the Stones We Want to Throw  

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Written on September 27, 2007 and posted today as a Favorite . . .

Earlier this week we were looking at how much we trust or do not trust God when he calls us to wade into the quagmire of the world.  Today in John we see Jesus speaking with “those Jews who believed in him” about knowing the truth . . . and how this knowledge will set them free.  They answer that the truth they know, the Law they know, comes from Abraham – who also waded into an unknown land with an unknown idea, a truth that was new for his time – that there is one true God . . . and that this one true God will set them free.  These believing Jews question Jesus, hear his words, and do not comprehend them.  They are so literal!  Jesus explains, coaches, encourages, tells the truth – but in the end, they picked up stones to throw at him.  How often do I do this?

In MAGNIFICAT today there is a meditation from John Henry Newman.  He writes: A religious mind is ever marveling, and irreligious men laugh and scoff at it because it marvels.  A religious mind is ever looking out of itself, is ever pondering God’s words, is ever “looking into” them with the angels, is ever realizing to itself him on whom it depends, and who is the center of all truth and good.  Carnal and proud minds are contented with self; they like to remain at home; when they hear the mysteries, they have no devout curiosity to go and see the great sight, though it be ever so little out of their way; and when it actually falls in their path, they stumble at it.

So I am thinking about this and I am realizing that Abraham was called out of his comfort zone and was given the opportunity to see into God’s mystery.  He entered into this mystery because he had spiritual curiosity.  He responded yes to God’s call, knowing that this response would cause him to leave the protection of what he knew . . . but that he would also experience something too wonderful to describe or understand – a covenant with his Maker.

Jesus also answers yes to God’s call.  He becomes human and wades into humanity  . . . taking great risk, but knowing that he need rely on the Father.  And he says this so clearly to these believing Jews . . . yet they miss it.  They turn away from the mystery – indeed they stumble over it as they pick up the stones they are about to hurl.

Today we ponder God’s words, and I like to think that the angels are peeking over our shoulders as we do so.  We delve into footnotes, dig out old notes, listen in the silence for the Word to hum in us as a tone hums in a tuning fork.  And if we are patient, we hear the reply to our questions, we feel taken into an embrace which protects yet gives liberty, we feel set free.

May we never pick up stones to hurl.  May we never act in such a way that Jesus hides and moves out of the temple area.  May we never be contented with self.  May we transform our proud selves with the mystery of our God and our creation.  May we always have spiritual curiosity.  And when we stumble, may we take the time to truly look at what we stumble over.  For there will be our God.

 Amen.


A re-post from September 11, 2010.

Image from: https://thenoontimes.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/soraya1-450pix1.jpg

Cameron, Peter John, Rev., ed. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 27 September 2007: 367. Print.

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