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Posts Tagged ‘the empty tomb’


magdalene at the tomb

Rembrandt van Rijn: Christ and Saint Mary Magdalene at the Tomb

Saturday, May 1, 2021

Presence

John records how Mary Magdalene goes to the tomb to anoint Jesus’ body but us startled to find an empty tomb. Believing that the body has been stolen, she leaves quickly to alert Peter and John. When the apostles arrive, they find the funeral cloths that had wrapped Jesus’ body the previous evening but still they do not believe in the resurrection. They return home puzzled but Mary remains, weeping.

We are equally surprised by life and its turnings, just as Mary is surprised. We also grapple with the reality before us and struggle to understand the mystery that surrounds us. We also give in to our grief and miss the gift of God’s constant presence.

Two angels ask Mary why she cries, and she answers, describing her grief. Christ then appears and Mary mistakes him for the gardener until he speaks her name. He reminds her that he is going to the Father and he asks that she deliver this good news to the disciples. (John 20)

We are equally overcome by grief and frustration, just as Mary Magdalene at the empty tomb. We also mistake the open door and the emptiness for nothingness. We overlook the risen Christ and instead we see an ordinary figure in our ordinary lives.

If we spend time today with this and the other three resurrection stories (Matthew 26, Mark 16 and Luke 24) we can compare our own Easter experience to the one recorded for us. Let us consider the gift of our own resurrection. Let us give thanks for our extraordinary lives that we live in our ordinary way. And let us give thanks for the gift of God’s eternal presence.


Image from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_20:14

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mary-and-friends-at-empty-tomb1Friday, April 30, 2021

Absence

Luke’s story of resurrection is longer and more involved than Matthew’s or Mark’s but again we see it is the women who go to the tomb to dress Jesus’ body. They are described as terrified, not of an earthquake, but of the unexpected absence of Jesus’ body. They take in this news delivered by two men in dazzling white who share words of peace, “Why do you seek the living one among the dead? He is not here, but he has been raised. Remember what he said to you while he was still in Galilee”. The facts are plain – Jesus is not in the tomb. The implications are enormous – Jesus’ resurrection will have changed their lives forever. They will never again see the world in the same way. They will never again see others in the same way. They will never again see the empty tomb in the same way. These early followers of Christ understand that everything has changed now that they have witnessed the Easter miracle. (Luke 24)

If we spend time today with this and the other three resurrection stories (Matthew 26, Mark 16 and John 20) we can compare our own Easter experience to the one recorded for us. As we reflect, let us consider: How do we continue to live as before now that we have been offered the gift of resurrection? What do we change about our behavior now that we have seen the risen Christ? How do we respond to God’s call for us to live in newness . . . now that we have experienced the fullness of the empty tomb?

Tomorrow, the story as told by John.


Image from: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/crossexamined/2012/04/women-at-the-tomb-weak-evidence-for-the-resurrection/

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empty tomb 2Thursday, April 29, 2021

Rolling Back the Stone

In Mark’s Gospel it is Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome who bring spices to anoint the dead body as they discuss how they will find help to roll back the heavy stone. Their concern shifts to another matter when they see that the tomb stands open . . . and empty. When they enter the tomb the angel, a young man clothed in a white robe, says to them, “Do not be amazed! You seek Jesus of Nazareth, the crucified. He has been raised and he is not here”. Despite these words, Mark tells us, they were afraid. (Mark 16)

If we spend time today with this and the other resurrection stories (Matthew 26, Luke 24, and John 20) we can compare our own Easter experience to the one recorded here for us. As we reflect, let us consider: How do we react when we discover that the stone has already been moved from the tomb? How do we share this experience of the empty burial place? How do we respond to the words that we need not be afraid?

Tomorrow, the story as told by Luke.


Image from: http://www.livingwithfaith.org/blog/who-was-the-other-mary-at-the-tomb

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empty tombWednesday, April 28, 2021

In the Gospel of Matthew, we read the description of an angel descending with the rumble of an earthquake as Mary Magdalene “and the other Mary” approach the tomb. The women are frightened and the guards “were shaken with fear of him and became like dead men”.

The angel utters the amazing words: Do not be afraid. He is not here. He is risen and gone to Galilee before you.

The women quickly leave the tomb and encounter the risen Christ on their way to deliver the surprising, but wonderful news to the other disciples. The words of peace are repeated: Do not be afraid. Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee. The guards accept a bribe and circulate the story of how Jesus’ followers stole the prophet’s body. (Matthew 28)

If we spend time today with this and the other three resurrection stories (Mark 16, Luke 24, and John 20) we can compare our own Easter experience to the one recorded for us. As we reflect, let us consider: How do we approach the tomb we believe to be empty? Who greets us? How do we react to these words?  How do we share this story of good news with others?

Tomorrow, the story as told by Mark.


Image from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nZuhnTzJrE

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John 20:1-10: The Impossible as Reality

Thursday, April 28, 2016Abundant-Life

 A Favorite from May 5, 2008.

 For some reason this chapter has popped up at Noontime several times.  Today, as always when this happens, we can look more closely at this reading . . . and this is what comes to me.

Today’s morning scripture reading is from Hebrews.

Faith is the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen.  Because of it the ancients were well attested.  11:1-2

I have often tried to imagine the rainbow of emotions which swept through Mary, Peter and John when they saw the empty tomb.  There were so many explanations of what might have happened.

This is the time of year in which we always re-live the Resurrection story.  Two thousand years after the fact, we are still experiencing the mix of doubt, fear, hope and joy which swept through the early apostolic band.  They had been accompanied by Jesus in life . . . now they would be accompanied by him and the Spirit . . . for eternity.

We are surprised by the absence of something we thought existed . . . someone who once was a foundation . . . some idea that gave us meaning.  We see, hear and feel the emptiness and sorrow of that loss.  Slowly, and painfully, we explore the possibilities.  Little by little we come to the realization that our existence is paradox.  We are divine, we are human . . . we are human, we are divine.

jesus is risenWe are slow to believe . . . we see the empty tomb . . . we know that our eyes do not deceive . . . we can imagine the possibilities . . . and we dare to hope . . . we dare to dream . . . we dare to live in a way we have never lived before.  The impossible becomes reality.

 

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