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Posts Tagged ‘2 Samuel 6’


Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Zechariah 9:9

Seeing the Summit as Plateau

Rejoice heartily, O daughter Zion, shout for joy, O daughter Jerusalem!  See, your king shall come to you; a just savior is he, meek, and riding on an ass, on a colt, the foal of an ass.

James Tissot: David Brings the Ark to Jerusalem

We reflect today on King David’s Jerusalem, examining our own lives for those times when all seemed right, when we felt our most competent, when challenges were met and breaches mended.  We look at a welcoming plateau in our lives when we reached what we thought was an ultimate summit.  We leaf through memories of warm relationships when decisions were reached easily and when we found a common bond with others who were anxious to fend off the common enemy.

In 2 Samuel 6 David enters Jerusalem bearing the Ark David, girt with a linen apron, came dancing before the Lord with abandon, as he all the Israelites were bringing up the ark of the Lord with shouts of joy and to the sound of the horn.  David’s success brings both elation and jealousy from others.  David’s entry into Jerusalem marks both beginning and an end

Today we recall Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as a hero. People swarm after him hoping to catch a glimpse, perhaps hoping for a cure of some disease or heartbreak.  His followers, jostled by the crowd, either rejoice with pride or grumble with aggravation.  But as Jesus descends from the Mount of Olives, he, his disciples and the crowd all move forward inexorably into the city. They roll along powered by their enthusiasm and joy.  They have no idea that within the week some of them will have betrayed him.  Some of them will have jeered at him.  Some of them will have denied or condemned him.

Picture2When we exert great effort and take great risks to do as God asks, we celebrate as we reach what we perceive to be a pinnacle; but we must learn to collapse into the refuge of the plateau that God offers us rather than consider that we have reached the end of our journey.  Today we look at Jerusalem when David enters bearing the presence of the Lord and in that moment we see both happiness and envy – we know the stories of the events that follow.  Today we look at Jerusalem as Jesus enters in victory as the presence of God among us and in that moment we see deep happiness tinged with sorrow – for again we know the stories of the events that follow. Today if we look closely at our own entry into Jerusalem as a follower of Christ we see that we bear both our gifts and our pain to the Lord.  We have struggled to reach an impossible victory yet we know that there are untold stories yet to tell.

Pietro Lorenzetti: Jesus Enters Jerusalem and the Crowds Welcome Him

We know that this mountaintop is not an end experience but a high point in our journey home.  We need not see this gain as a loss for we are Easter people who live in Christ who tells us that the wonder and miracle of the Easter story that is about to unfold is true.  We know that each time we discover that a new conquest has been followed by a new defeat . . . we also discover that God is with us to carry us home.

When we find that our mountain victory is simply a plateau on which to rest we must rejoice . . . for we know that God is with us.

Spend some time today with King David’s Jerusalem as you make connections to your own Jerusalem experience.


Tissot image from: http://www.jesuswalk.com/david/08_david_ark.htm 

Lorenzetti image from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triumphal_entry_into_Jerusalem 

King David’s Jerusalem: https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/myth-and-reality-of-king-david-s-jerusalem

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Saturday, July 5, 2014

1 Chronicles 16

The Ark Comes to Jerusalem

Anonymous: King David Dances Before the Ark

Anonymous: King David Dances Before the Ark

Here – and also in 2 Samuel 6 – we see David bring the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem amid celebration and festivity. The presence of God brings a response of joy and thanksgiving from the people. The priest blesses both the occasion and the faithful; David cavorts with elation; a meal is served. The people worship God because the Ark containing sacred text, sacred food and the sacred blooming staff has taken up residence. These people feel invulnerable, joyful and grateful.

Within each of us is the place where God dwells and where scripture flourishes like Aaron’s staff. We are sustained by the new desert manna: the body and blood of Christ. We take this dwelling with us on our desert journey. We too might leap for joy and bow down in reverence and happiness. We too might bring the Ark to Jerusalem. There is no obstacle to knowing God’s presence except the obstacles we ourselves set up.

Give thanks to the Lord, invoke his name.

God is the originator of all that is good and holy.

Glory in his holy name; rejoice, O hearts that seek the Lord!

We can offer up all that sorrows us when we come into the presence of the Lord.

Look to the Lord in his strength; seek to serve him constantly.

We honor God when we perform his works rather than our own.

Give to the Lord . . . bring gifts and enter into his presence.

The best offering to God is that of ourselves. We carry to him the burdens of our day, our attempts to do his bidding.

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good, for his kindness endures forever.

We do not need to build an ark to house our sacred reminders of God’s presence for we already possess it. It is our hearts that hold all sacredness holy.

We do not need to build a temple to God for it is already built. It is the temple of our bodies.

We do not need to offer burnt sacrifices to God for they are already present in any sorrow we experience.

So let us bring the burnt remnants of our losses, let us give thanks for God’s providence and care, and let us rejoice in the knowing that we are created for love by love.

David brings the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem to place it in the tent set aside for Yahweh.

Let us lay our burdens on the altar of our lives . . . and like David, let us leap and dance for joy.

Adapted from a reflection written on February 21, 2009.

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