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Posts Tagged ‘our relationship with God’


1 Samuel 6No Strange God

Friday, December 7, 2018

Written on January 12 and posted today as a  Favorite . . .

This is a portion of the Ark story we might find interesting.  In earlier chapters, the Philistines have taken the Ark, hoping to benefit from what they believe to be its extraordinary power.  What they do not understand is that the Ark is not an object of magic or superstition to be used as they wish.  What it does hold is this: Aaron’s staff which bloomed as a sign of God’s presence when the Hebrews were captive in Egypt, manna that sustained them in the desert as they journeyed toward the land promised to them by God, and the tablets of commandments given them by God through Moses.  It is not the Ark which now sustains the Israelites in battle as they struggle to maintain their identity in a world that wishes to eliminate them, it is God himself.  And this is something the Philistines do not understand.  Things have gone badly for them since they seized the Ark in a raid and now they wonder how to best dispose of it.

We enter the story today and watch as they determine what to do.  There are wonderful lessons to be learned from all of this.

First, God does not exist in some inanimate object.  God is within and without because God is everywhere.  We cannot hide from God, nor can we sort of summon God and put him away when we do and do not want him present.  Because God is everywhere, we need never fear that we are alone; and we must work to form our best relationship with God.

Second, we cannot somehow seize, steal or borrow someone else’s successful relationship with God.  We cannot pretend with God, nor can we fake anything with God.  Because God is authentic, it is impossible to form a false bond with him; and our best connection will be one that is open, honest, and humble.

Third, we cannot manipulate God in any way.  We cannot bargain, control or wheedle our way into God’s goodness, nor can we avoid God in any way.  Because God is omnipotent, it is impossible to out-maneuver God; and the best way to interact with him is with frankness and readiness to do God’s will.

There is, no doubt, much we might say about this reading; but the simple message is this: Our honesty, authenticity, security and humility are key to a healthy relationship with God.

In today’s MAGNIFICAT Morning Prayer mini-reflection we read: Now and then, God’s people of old needed to be reminded of the care with which his love had surrounded and protected them.  Now and then we do too!  This introduces a canticle from Deuteronomy 32:3-7, 10-12.  You may want to read it today.  It concludes . . . The Lord alone was their leader, no strange god was with him.

The Philistines do not understand the true source of Israel’s power.  Believing it to come from a magic box, they do not comprehend that true power and authority comes from an honest, authentic and humble relationship with God.  We hold this in our hands and feet each day.  Our power comes from the way we act out our relationship with God.  Let us pray for the grace to accept this gift, for the meekness to allow God to work within us, and the serenity that comes from knowing that we are secure in God who has no strange gods with him.


A re-post from November 4, 2011.

Images from: http://areureallyawake.wordpress.com/tag/gods-love/page/2/ and http://www.mishkanministries.org/theark.php 

Cameron, Peter John, ed. “Prayer for the Morning.” MAGNIFICAT. 12.1 (2011): Print.  

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1 Kings 18: Deception – Part IV

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Mount Carmel

Mount Carmel

The Prophets of Baal

Today’s Noontime is a story we hear read out to us at least once during the liturgical cycle; it is the story of the people’s relationship with God that takes place during a time when Yahweh’s prophets were being persecuted.  It is also a time of high political intrigue when the kingdom brought together under David’s leadership has split in two.  Ahab, Jezebel, Obadiah, and Elijah find themselves caught up in the kind of turmoil that guarantees suffering.

Elijah, the only surviving prophet of Yahweh, appeals to the people, and allows God to work through him to remind the split nations that despite their petty squabbles God is in charge.  The prophets of Baal bring all of their power and influence to bear and still they cannot best Elijah and Yahweh.  This is a good story and it deserves enough reading that we can apply it to our own lives.

What or who might be the Baal prophets in our lives?  Who is it we believe more than God who created us and cares for us beyond all human capacity?  Who is it we follow more eagerly than Jesus who redeems and saves us daily?   And who is it we love more intensely than the Spirit who guides us and counsels us every minute of our day and night?

The humor with which Elijah pits the Baal gods and their prophets against Yahweh makes today’s reading entertaining and authentic.  We may want to look for the humor in our own struggle to survive the droughts and famines of our days.  And we may want to ask ourselves the same question that Elijah asks his audience:  How long will you straddle the issue?  If the Lord is God, follow him; if Baal, follow him. 

Written on June 14, 2010.

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Matthew 9:9-13: Loving God

love-godSeventh Sunday of Easter, May 17, 2015

We have spent the last six weeks journeying through the Gospel of Matthew, comparing different versions of holy verse, reflecting on beatitudes, teachings, explanations and hidden meanings and open miracles. Today we arrive at the poignant story of Matthew’s call. Jesus saw a man named Matthew sitting at the customs post. He said to him, “Follow me”. And he got up and followed him. Jesus finds a stalwart follower among the least likely of candidates. He chooses a man closely linked with the corrupt structure of his day. He chooses a man avoided by adherents of his own religion. He chooses a man who is much like each of us.

Today we consider words written by Saint Caesarius of Arles, (c. 470-543) bishop, theologian, and preacher. His message about our relationship with, and love of God is as pertinent today as it was in the fifth century.

Begin to love God, and you will love man for his sake . . . When he are called to God’s work, we respond as we would to a dear and valued friend, and although this response may bring us turmoil it also brings us union with Christ himself.

If a man begins to love God, he will love nothing in man except in him . . . When we begin to regard God as a dear friend, we can do nothing but respond to God’s call, and although this call may at times confuse us it will ultimately bring us healing and transformation.

You should not possess or love a friend in order that he might give you something . . . A friend must be loved without recompense . . . When we begin to love without asking in return, we receive recompense far greater than any we might have imagined.

sermon_lovinggodThere is nothing finer, nothing sweeter than God . . . When we fully realize that there nothing in the world as valuable as our friendship with God, we begin to comprehend the meaning of loving God before anything or anyone else.

As we approach the miracle of the Pentecost, let us move forward in Easter resurrection celebration. And let us willingly, fully and openly step forward to follow our dearest friend, our loving God.

 

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