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Posts Tagged ‘humility’


Matthew 6:1-4: Teaching on Almsgivinggivinghands

Saturday, April 30, 2022

From the June 20, 2007 MAGNIFICAT reflection, an excerpt from the writings on Hans Urs von Balthasar, a Swiss theologian: “God is no trainer of souls bent on attaining extravagant record performances. He is a Lover who wants nothing but great love and who accepts with a smile everything such love invents to offer him. But he declines everything man uses – no matter how subtly – to put on airs before him.”

God says: The world draws you to extol yourself, to outdo your neighbors, to store up goods for yourself, to regard yourself as the creator of your world. I ask you to aside all prizes and titles except for those I give to you each day. I give you my love unconditionally. I give you myself ceaselessly. I give you life eternally. I call you my children. I call you sisters and brother of Jesus. I call you salt and light for the world. Does not this outweigh all that the world has to offer? All that I offer must – surely – be enough. When you give alms you demonstrate that you understand this relationship with me and my kingdom. When you practice humility you prepare yourself to receive me in my Way. You prepare yourself to travel with me in this eternal path.

Read more about Hans Urs von Balthasar and consider what lessons his life has to offer us as we struggle with our own search for genuine humility. Visit: http://www.ignatiusinsight.com/authors/vonbalthasar.asp

Tomorrow, bringing hearts and minds together in Beatitude. 


Cameron, Peter John. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 20.6.12 (2007). Print.

Image from: http://classicalchristianity.com/2012/01/29/on-almsgiving/

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Matthew 5:5: The MeekPsalm-37-11

Easter Monday, April 18, 2022

On this Easter Monday we continue our reflection on the Beatitudes as we re-focus our attention on God’s priorities rather than our own.

Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the land. (Matthew’s account of the Sermon on the Mount)

Perhaps patience is the quality we most need if we are to be humble servants. Patience in our understanding that we are not in charge. Patience in our knowing that it is God’s wisdom and grace that answers our deepest questions. Patience in allowing God’s fidelity and mercy to invade all that we do. Patience in both giving and accepting God’s healing love. Psalm 27 reminds us what we gain when we are able to wait. These verses bring into focus what it is we inherit, and why the land in which the Spirit dwells is worth our offering of meekness.

Though a host encamp against me, my heart will not fear . . .

On this Easter Monday we celebrate God’s strength . . .

Though war arise against me, I shall be confident . . .

We celebrate God’s hope . . .

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living . . .

We celebrate God’s gift of eternal life and love . . .  

Wait for the Lord; be strong and let your heart take courage . . .

We celebrate God’s gift of promise . . .

Yes, wait for the Lord . . .

We celebrate God’s gift of persistence.

2012042151empty_tombWhen our quiet strength rises from God we have no need to boast or strut. When our simple humility follows the example of Christ we have no need to exclude or divide. When our genuine meekness grows in the Spirit of God we have no need to hate or avenge. Let us wait on the Lord, let us give thanks for God’s presence, and let us celebrate the patience we inherit that offers us the gift of God’s meekness.

Using the scripture links, explore different versions of these verses and give thanks for our inheritance of meekness.

Tomorrow, the merciful. 


Images from: http://eagleviews.org/2011/10/14/they-say-he-said/ and http://flowers-kid.com/easter-empty-tomb-images.htm

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John: Naming OurselvesMislabeling-the-Word-of-God

Monday, March 28, 2022

In beautiful prose, the writer of John’s Gospel gives us many portals to name Christ, to understand the person of Jesus, and to model ourselves after this Word of God Among Us.  As we move closer to Palm Sunday, as we prepare to enter the holiest of times in the liturgical calendar, let us take time to assess who Jesus is, how we convey to the world our own understanding of God in the person of Jesus, and how we intend to change in order that we become more like this saving servant.

Chapter 1: Word of God and Light of the World – What does it mean to be the Word of God? Do we enact God’s mercy and justice in our actions and words? How might we bring light to the world’s darkness? Do we look for hope, bring peace, and heal others?

Chapter 3: Spirit of God – God grants us eternal life. What do we store up for this eternity? Where does our treasure lie? Do we offer life or death to ourselves and others?

Chapters 4 – 9: Healer and Miracle Worker – How do we become the hands and feet of Christ? When do we allow God to work many small miracles for and through us? How often do we witness to injustice? When and why do we heal ourselves and others?

good shepherdChapter 10: The Good Shepherd – We have the prophets’ cry out against false shepherd and teachers. Do we number among them? Do we listen for the voice of Jesus the Shepherd? Do we put aside the world to follow the one true shepherd? When do we call others to follow in Christ’s Way?

Chapters 11-12: Restorer of Life – We cannot raise Lazarus from the dead but we can restore wounded hearts, ask and grant forgiveness, bridge gaps and mend fences. We are capable of bringing hope to the hopeless, mercy to the marginalized and love to the abandoned and brutalized. When and where do we grant these gifts we have been given by God?

Chapters 13 – 14: Advocate – It is easy to look away from problems and slip into denial. Who are our loved ones, associates, colleagues and friends? Do they call us to good or encourage us to hide in darkness?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAChapters 15 – 17: Vine for our Branches – God gives us the choice to be life-takers or life-givers. What path do we choose and why? Are we willing to change course once we see that we need to change? Do we offer to God the apology saying that we are content in our comfort zone? Do we inflict discomfort on others or call them gently? What nourishment do we allow God to bring us and how do we pass this sacred sustenance along?

Chapters 18 – 20: Lamb of God – Humility is such a difficult quality to wear in our status and power-driven world and yet it is essential. Do we strive for the meekness that Jesus displays? Do we give more than we receive? What role does pride play in our lives? How do we handle our own sense of entitlement and that of others?

Chapter 21: Resurrection – There are no words to express the beauty of God’s desire to bring us to eternal happiness in the kingdom. What fidelity to do we show to the Gospel story in our actions and words? What narrative of resurrection do we live out? What promise of resurrection to we believe? And how do we witness to the miracles of resurrection we know God performs constantly in our own lives and in the lives of others?

empty tomb with sheet and lightWe are perhaps too accustomed to these images and if this is so, we must spend quiet time with them today. If we celebrate and enact these metaphors in our lives daily then let us rejoice in the Good News that is so familiar. In either case, let us spend time with these names and call ourselves followers of Christ as today we prepare for the Palm Sunday gift of Jesus as the very name of God.

Tomorrow, Christ in Us.


Images from: http://www.redletterchristians.org/mislabeling-the-word-of-god/, http://jnwheels.com/tag/jnwheels/, http://galleryhip.com/i-am-the-vine-you-are-the-branches-bible.html, and http://wallpaper-kid.com/empty-tomb-worship-backgrounds.htm

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Sirach 51:23-30: In Earnestlistening To God

March 11, 2015

Wisdom is close to those who seek her, and the one who is in earnest finds her.

Much is written about wisdom and finding the key that unlocks access to her depths. We spend many hours and a great deal of money looking for the wisest ways to earn a living, to make solid friendships, to find the magical access to happiness. And while we search, we often overlook Wisdom’s presence in the simplest of times, the most unpretentious spaces, and the humblest of relationships. Wisdom is not to be found in the glitz and glory; rather, Wisdom makes her home with the meek, the ordinary and the earnest.

If we spend time with these verses today and compare varying versions of the text, let us take stock of the places we frequent, the people we befriend, and the time we spend with our creator.


In some traditions, the book of Sirach is categorized as Apocrypha. Use the scripture link to explore different versions of this citation and listen in earnest for Wisdom’s whispered words.

Image from: http://whomshallisend.blogspot.com/2012_02_26_archive.html

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parentsFriday, December 17, 2021

Joy and Sirach 3

Honor

Continuing with wisdom recorded by Jesus ben Sirach, we find more words that surprise us with joy. If today’s Noontime calls you to search for more ways to encounter joy, click on the word Joy in the categories cloud in the blog’s right hand sidebar and choose a reflection, enter the word Joy in the blog search bar. Today we consider the great joy that is found when we honor wisdom.

In this Chapter, Ben Sirach writes about family relationships, humility, docility, and the giving of alms to the poor. In all of this lies the quiet theme of honor.

Verse 3:5: Those who honor their parents will have joy in their own children, and when they pray they are heard.

joyGod says: Some of you have no children born from your union with another; yet you provide the wisdom of elders to many. Some of you have never known your parents; yet you honor those who have served you well as mentors and guides. Many of you have siblings who love your parents as you do and siblings who are jealous of your relationship with your parents. There is not a singular model for family life in the many cultures that blossom around the world, but there is a singular path to follow in finding joy. Through your humble service to others you honor me and bring honor to your family. Through your quiet, docile care of the poor you gladden others and bring joy to me.  

Choose more of these verses and reflect on them, considering how often honor and wisdom are present in your own family. Compare the different versions of Sirach 3 at the scripture link above and reflect on Jesus Ben Sirach’s words.


Image from: https://humanangels.wordpress.com/tag/people/

For more information about anxiety and joy, visit: http://riselikeair.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/anxiety-joy-a-journey/

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proverbs 12-20Monday, December 6, 2021

Joy and Proverbs

Deceit

The Book of Proverbs is more than mere adages we repeat in moments of confusion or stress. They are universal metaphors that serve as anchors in a bewildering and sometimes tumultuous world. Many resources are available to understand these maxims and during this second week of Advent we will focus on the surprising power of the proverbs to reveal God’s truth to us.  If this week’s exploration of Proverbs calls you to search for more ways to encounter joy, click on the word Joy in the categories cloud in the blog’s right hand sidebar and choose a reflection, or enter the word Joy in the blog search bar. Today we find joy even in deceit.

Each of us has experienced a time when joy has been difficult to find. It is sometimes difficult to imagine that the wickedness and deceit we see around us will ever dissipate; peace and serenity seem powerless against the forces of corruption and treachery. Betrayal, envy, slander, gossip, plots against the innocent and vulnerable, schemes against the marginalized and voiceless seem far more powerful than the power of humility, serenity and peace. But then we might be thinking that we must generate goodness from our own resources . . . and we will have forgotten that God alone can penetrate stony hearts, Christ alone is the path to resurrection, the Spirit alone abides through hate and calumny and fear

Verse 10:28: The hope of the just brings joy, but the expectation of the wicked perishes.

joyGod says: What is the justice I ask you to bring to the world? Is it a gargantuan task that saps every bit of energy you possess? Is it a complex plot with an infinite number of people and parts? No . . . the justice I ask you to bring is you witnessing. Stand with the marginalized and the innocent. The justice I ask you to enact is your voice. Speak when the Spirit asks you to speak. The justice I ask you to nurture is your outrageous hope that all things are possible in and through me for the hope of the just brings joy.

Verse 12:20: Deceit is in the heart of those who plot evil, but those who counsel peace have joy.

God says: When you experience every kind of deceit, you need not hide or cower in the shadows. Step into the light of my goodness and live as you know you are called to live. When plots unfold before you, allow my peace to fill you. When schemes unravel around you, allow my serenity to guide you. When intrigue and conspiracy reign, step into my quiet stillness and know that I am with you. In this way you will experience joy . . . even in the cruelest of circumstances.

During this second week in Advent we will continue to share simple verses from Proverbs that bring joy to our hearts. Tomorrow, God’s joy is present even in the midst of evil.


For more information about anxiety and joy, visit: http://riselikeair.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/anxiety-joy-a-journey/

Image from: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/345088390170692266/

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Temple

The Jerusalem Temple in the days of Herod

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Ephesians 4:1-6

In a Manner Worthy

For a number of weeks we have spent our noontimes with the prophecy of Jeremiah examining the loss of the great temple, the destruction of Jerusalem, and the humbling experience of exile and deportation. We have also considered our own exile, we have reflected on the prophet’s foreshadowing of the Christ, and we have examined how we might be Jeremiah’s enemies or companions. Today we consider the final message from the prophet that holds so much importance for us. Despite accumulating deceits and betrayals, there is always hope . . . because God is always with us, moving us to live in a manner worthy of God’s call.

From Paul’s letter to the early Christians in Ephesus, and to each of us . . .

I, then, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to live in a manner worthy of the call you have received . . .

In an ever-quicker world we may not pause often enough to hear God’s voice.

With all humility and gentleness . . .

In an always-competitive world we may not make room for those on the margins.

With patience, bearing with one another through love . . .

In an increasingly self-centric world we may not feel the need to advocate for those who have no voice.

Striving to preserve the unity of the spirit through the bond of peace . . .

In a world of crisis and emergency we may not restore the soul or rest in God.

One body and one Spirit . . .

In an always-dynamic world we may not see that we are one.

As you were also called to the one hope of your call . . .

In an always-problematic world we may not believe in a reason to hope.

humilityOne Lord, one faith, one baptism . . .

In an always-divergent world we may not want to listen to others.

One God and Father of all . . .

In a world that thinks there is no God we may not witness to injustice and corruption.

Who is over all and through all and in all . . .

In an always-vibrant world we must believe that we are worthy of the call that God has sent us.

Amen.


To learn more about Solomon’s Temple and the renovations made by Herod, visit The Archeology of the Bible site by clicking the temple image above or visiting: http://www.bible-archaeology.info/temple_of_jerusalem.htm 

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jesus-lightFriday, September 17, 2021

Psalm 25

God Shows the Way – Part I

The Lord is good and upright. He shows the path to those who stray, he guides the humble in the right path; he teaches his way to the poor.

The humble, the poor, and those who stray. God tends to those who stumble along The Way Christ shows us.

My eyes are always on the Lord; for he rescues my feet from the snare. Turn to me for I am poor and lonely.

These words touch a chord within us and it may be for this reason that Psalm 25 is frequently used at funerals. We are sending a loved one off on a journey that each of us will take . . . and we are not always certain of the way we ought to go.

Psalm 25 is an acrostic with the first letter of each verse being a successive letter of the alphabet.  As we sing this song, “the palmist mixes ardent pleas (1-2, 16-22) with expressions of confidence in God who forgives and guides”.  (Senior 661)

John 14:1-12 is also often read at a funeral Mass because it brings us comfort to know that there really is no mystery about how to live our lives or what we are to do when we die.

Do not let your heart be troubled; believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many dwelling places; if it were not so, I would have told you; for I go to prepare a place for you. I will come again and receive you to myself, that where I am, there you may be also. And you know the way where I am going.”

When we are able to find a pocket of calm from which to assess our lives, we know that in subtle ways, and sometimes not so subtle ways, God provides us with a map for our lives. And when we can trust God enough to relax into the goodness that God is, we also realize we are sent suggestions for our lives much like the directions we receive when we plug in a GPS (Global Positioning System). God constantly warns, guides, prods, encourages and finally shows us The Way we are to go. We have only to relax and follow.

From today’s MAGNIFICAT (315) Day by Day reflection by Heather King, a spiritual writer and a convert to Catholicism: This was a God who was with us in our darkest human moments, who had suffered every insult, humiliation, confusion, loneliness that we have.  I’d think, he knew what it is to yearn, to feel like a loser, a failure, and a misfit . . . I began to see that this God – who had the power to do anything; who commanded the sun and stars – had instead consented to empty himself and become the hardest thing in the universe it is possible to be: a mortal being.  He’s become human in order to enter into our daily lives, to be with us every waking and sleeping moment, to fulfill the deepest desire of the human heart: to not be so eternally, everlastingly alone.  In a way I was becoming a believer just because Christ did fulfill the deepest desire of the heart: isn’t it our greatest wish that God not be some faraway abstract entity, but somehow like us?  That God walks among us is so simple we refuse to believe it; it so fulfills our deepest yearning we’re blind to the fact that it actually has been fulfilled . . . Christ is [not] a fairy tale, or wishful thinking, or an illusion.  We can bring things into being only by believing them with the purest of hearts. We can bring into being only the true and the real – “I am the way the truth, and the life” (John 14:6) – what already exists in a sense.

Jeremiah tells us that God has a plan in mind for us, a plan for our joy and not our woe. As we search for The Way, we humble ourselves . . . as God faithfully shows us The Way.

Tomorrow, how can we not follow? God shows the way, part two.


Cameron, Peter John. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 22.5 (2011): 315. Print.  

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.661. Print.   

Adapted from a reflection written on May 22, 2011.

Image from: http://pamandersonblog.com/2013/07/

 

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Saturday, June 26, 2021

1 Samuel 12

christ washing feetJudging         

Yesterday we contemplated how we might refrain from judging one another. Today we reflect on how we might judge as God judges.

Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 4:3-5. Here I am; testify against me before the Lord . . . It does not concern me in the least that I be judged by you or any human tribunal . . .

What we read today is how to “fear” the Lord, how to stand in awe of God before all else and before anyone else. Only God is God. Only God matters. God alone is enough, says Teresa of Ávila.

The Liturgy of the Hours prayers and Mass readings often reflect this theme.

Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful . . . Whoever exalts himself will be humbled . . . Whoever humbles himself will be exalted.

Stop judging and you will not be judged. Stop condemning and you will not be condemned. Forgive and you will be forgiven.

Pride sets subtle snares. Whenever we imagine that we are in control of life – our own or someone else’s – we have fallen prey to the ancient whisper in the Garden: “You shall be like gods”. Mortality is the enduring reminder that we become like God not only by our own power but by the power of the cross. (MAGNIFICAT, 304)

We have a number of reminders today: No one’s but God’s opinion matters; we do not need to strive to be gods for we are children of God; we behave divinely when we humble ourselves just as Jesus does; our happiness comes after and through our suffering; pride is deceptive and alluring.

In his farewell speech, Samuel challenges his audience to judge him or to find fault with his conduct. Paul tells us that he does not care at all about who judges him or how. The one who judges me is the Lord. Of course, we can take these views to the extreme and pretend that we can do as we like and that we do not have to conform to any civil rules or social mores. This would be an extreme and unreasonable position to hold for even Jesus tells us to render Caesar’s business unto Caesar. The words we read today help us with the most important part of our being . . . our spiritual self. These words today help us to focus properly on what is vital to us and significant in our lives: our relationship with God.

Fortunately for us God is merciful and forgiving. Blessedly for us God loves us and is waiting for us to turn to him. God waits for us graciously and compassionately. Let us accept God’s gift with humility. Let us take the lowest seat at the table so that we might stand before God and others to declare our faithfulness to God in confidence and love.


Cameron, Peter John, Rev., ed. “Mini-Reflection.” MAGNIFICAT. 22 March 2011. 304. Print.

Image from: http://drtimwhite.com/humility-is-key-to-the-unity-of-a-church/

Adapted from a reflection written on March 22, 2011.

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