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Posts Tagged ‘burden’


Psalm 71:17-20: Deep Places

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Psalm 71:17-20You have shown me great troubles and adversities; but you will restore my life and bring me up again from the deep places of the earth.

The deep places are dark and lonely.  Jeremiah speaks of the terror of the miry cistern.  Many are lost in the dark places; yet that is precisely where many are found.

God says: I understand the terror you feel when darkness pulls you down.  Jeremiah speaks my words to you when he says, “Obey the Lord and all will go well with you, your life will be spared”.  It may appear that obedience to me is a capitulation of self but it is rather a coming to fullness, a burgeoning into fruit which is good.  Your troubles and worries will melt away when you bring them to me.  They are too great for you to carry.  Bring your burdens to me, and I will give you rest.

Let us give our yoke to God today . . . nothing is too heavy for God to bear.

Investigate and reflect on the prophecy of Jeremiah on the Jeremiah – Person and Message page on this blog at: https://thenoontimes.com/the-book-of-our-life/jeremiah-person-and-message/


Image from: http://risingmoonastrology.blogspot.com/2012/03/moon-into-scorpio-deep-places.html

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Psalm 119: God Carries My Burden

Friday, July 5, 2019

Psalm 119:25, 37, 40, 50, 93, 145, 154 I am laid low in the dust; preserve my life according to your word.  Turn my eyes away from worthless things; preserve my life according to your word.  How I long for your precepts!  Preserve my life in your righteousness.  My comfort in my suffering is this: your promise preserves my life.  I will never forget your precepts, for by them you have preserved my life.  I call with my whole heart; answer me, O Lord, that I may keep your statutes.  Defend my life and redeem me; preserve my life according to your promises. 

This psalm is the longest in this longest of Books in the Bible.  It is an ‘alphabetical’ psalm in that the first 8 verses of each strophe begin with the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet and each verse (except for verse 122) contains one of the terms of the Law or Teachings or Statutes in which Jesus was raised.  This psalm, along with many others, and the Books of the Torah, Wisdom and Prophets, were Jesus’ school house.  The revelation handed down through the millennia to guide humankind still serves us today.  When we see the word life in this psalm, we understand it to refer to the concept of life in its fullest sense: happiness, security, and liberation from all that oppresses us.

God says: I know that sometimes you are so burdened you cannot think.  You have so much to do that there is no time.  You are so tired that you cannot sleep.  Yet . . . I abide with you still . . . even though you do not see me . . . even though you may not feel my presence . . . still, I am with you, as I am always with you . . . even until the end of time.  If all you can do is pray this verse today, that is enough: “I call with my whole heart; answer me, O Lord, that I may keep your statutes”.  I am answering you each time you call.  Listen, for I am near. 

All of God’s promises are renewed.  All of God’s promises are kept.  May you know the love and peace of Christ.

Explore the reflection on the God Time page of this blog: https://thenoontimes.com/god-time/


A re-post from June 21, 2012.

Image of detail from a mural by Diego Rivera from: http://domania.us/SwordSisters/Inspirations5/Burden.html

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Monday, January 26, 2015

Daniel 12

Dimensions

Daniel 12: 3: The wise shall shine brightly like the splendor of the firmamement, and those who lead the many to justice shall be like the stars forever.

Daniel 12: 3: The wise shall shine brightly like the splendor of the firmament, and those who lead the many to justice shall be like the stars forever and ever.

“Daniel’s apocalyptic view of history is most fully laid out in Chapters 10-12, which make up one long vision. There an angel explains to Daniel that there is an ongoing battle in heaven between the archangels Michael and Gabriel on the one hand and the angelic “princes” of Persia and Greece on the other. This battle is reflected on earth in the wars of the Hellenistic age, which are described at length in Chapter 11 . . . At the end Michael will arise in victory and the resurrection will follow”. (Senior RG 349)

Apocalyptic writing was popular in the centuries before and after Jesus’ birth and although it is characterized by symbolism and descriptions of cataclysmic events, it is rooted in the teachings of the prophets. Dire circumstances and extreme conditions experienced by the Jewish people provided fertile ground for early writers as they warned, predicted and called the remnant people to fidelity. Living in times of hopelessness and desperation, the faithful took heart as they heard the stories of rescue, redemption and salvation. These images laid the groundwork for the genesis of Christianity, and Jesus’ introduction of the work of discipleship.

Many shall be refined, purified, and tested, but the wicked shall be proven wicked, none of them shall have understanding, but the wise shall have it. (Daniel 12:10)

Jesus describes the life of a disciple clearly in his Sermon on the Mount:  Blessed are you when people insult you and persecute you, and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward in heaven is great; for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you. (Matthew 5:11-12)

Daniel 12:12: Blessed is the one who has patience and perseveres . . .

Jesus tells a parable of the persistent widow who patiently returns to a corrupt judge, asking endlessly for justice. Now He was telling them a parable to show that at all times they ought to pray and not to lose heart . . . (Luke 18:1-8)

Daniel 12:13: Go, take your rest, you shall rise for your reward . . .

Jesus asks us that to give him our worries and anxieties that are too great for us to bear. Come to me, all who are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light. (Matthew 11:28-30)

sleep in the dustThis portion of Daniel’s prophecy brings a new perspective of an old vision. Battle between good and evil are not new. But what Daniel brings us is the foreshadowing of a new and wonderful reason for hope and joy. Daniel opens up for us a new dimension. The world of joy born out of pain, of celebration rising from sorrow, and of new hope burgeoning from old wounds.

When we spend time with Daniel 12 today, we see new light leading us into a world of new dimension.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.RG 149. Print.   

For more reflections on this prophecy, enter the word Daniel into the blog search bar and explore. 

 

 

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Good-NewsSaturday

December 13, 2014

Joy and Proverbs

Good News

The Book of Proverbs is more than mere adages we repeat in moments of confusion or stress. They are universal metaphors that serve as anchors in a bewildering and sometimes tumultuous world. Many resources are available to understand these maxims and during this second week of Advent we will focus on the surprising power of the proverbs to reveal God’s truth to us.  If this week’s exploration of Proverbs calls you to search for more ways to encounter joy, click on the word Joy in the categories cloud in the blog’s right hand sidebar and choose a reflection, or enter the word Joy in the blog search bar. You may also want to visit the Joy for the Journey blog at www.joyforthee.blogspot.com to see how joy surprises you there. Today we celebrate the joy of Good News.

In this second week of Advent we have found joy in dark places as we share proverbs. Today we remind ourselves that the hope of the Old Testament is fulfilled in the Word of the New Testament. And we remember that Jesus, God Among Us, is the incarnation of that promise and word.

Proverbs 15:23: One has joy from an apt response; a word in season, how good it is!

We have the choice each day to speak words that hurt or words that heal.

Matthew 4:23: Jesus went throughout Galilee, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom and curing every disease and every sickness among the people.

We have the choice each day to speak words that burden us or words that uplift.

joyMark 1:14: Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God.

We have the choice each day to speak words that bring energy or words that sap strength.

Proverbs 15:30: A cheerful glance brings joy to the heart; good news invigorates the bones.

We have the choice each day to speak words that speak truth or words that lie.

Luke 8:1: Soon afterwards he went on through cities and villages, proclaiming and bringing the good news of the kingdom of God.

We have the choice each day to speak words of Good News or words of darkness.

Mark 16:15: And Jesus said to them, “Go into all the world and proclaim the good news to the whole creation”.

We continue our Advent journey, and today we pause to consider the power of God’s joy when we share the Good News that God has come to live among us.

For more information about anxiety and joy, visit: http://riselikeair.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/anxiety-joy-a-journey/

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worried3344Thursday

December 11, 2014

Joy and Proverbs

Worry

The Book of Proverbs is more than mere adages we repeat in moments of confusion or stress. They are universal metaphors that serve as anchors in a bewildering and sometimes tumultuous world. Many resources are available to understand these maxims and during this second week of Advent we will focus on the surprising power of the proverbs to reveal God’s truth to us.  If this week’s exploration of Proverbs calls you to search for more ways to encounter joy, click on the word Joy in the categories cloud in the blog’s right hand sidebar and choose a reflection, or enter the word Joy in the blog search bar. You may also want to visit the Joy for the Journey blog at www.joyforthee.blogspot.com to see how joy surprises you there. Today we put aside our worries and discover the surprise of joy.

In this second week of Advent we continue to share simple verses from Proverbs that bring joy to our lives and lift our hearts.

Verse 12:25: Worry weighs down the heart, but a kind word gives it joy.

joyGod says: A million little worries throw up constant hurdles throughout your days and remain to haunt your troubled nights. These worries too often begin as small discomforts and then mushroom into crushing fears. When these niggling thoughts creep into your lives, bring them to me. When your heart is too heavily burdened, it cannot soar with the joy I have placed in you and so I ask you to place your worries on my broad shoulders. If you are living the gift of joy today, share it with one who is weighed down with uneasiness and disquiet. Lend a smile, share a warm embrace or give a ready hand to those who struggle. In this way, and to your great surprise, you will find that your own joy increases a thousand-fold.  

Jesus says: Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. (Matthew 11:28-30)

Tomorrow, God’s presence in folly.

For more information about anxiety and joy, visit: http://riselikeair.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/anxiety-joy-a-journey/

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Tuesday, December 18, 2012 – Titus 3 – Prepare

El Greco: The Apostle Paul

El Greco: The Apostle Paul

This brief letter has something to say to us about forming community.  Today we reflect on its third and last chapter.  Titus was an assistant to Paul mentioned in some of his other letters and also in Acts.  He began a Christian community on the island of Crete, and Paul counsels him about how he might advise these early Christians to live among deceivers and heretics . . . these are words we might use today.

Be under the control of magistrates and authorities . . . be obedient . . . open to every good enterprise . . . slander no one . . . be peaceable, considerate, exercising all graciousness toward everyone. 

Paul reminds Titus and us that we have all been foolish, disobedient, deluded, slaves to various desires and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful ourselves and hating one another.  No one but a saint escapes the downside of humanity.

The upside, the good news is that the Christ has come to walk among us . . . to be one of us . . . to take on our burdens which overwhelm us . . . because he is goodness and mercy in their most perfect form.

What are we to do to reach for such heights?  Avoid foolish arguments, genealogies, rivalries and quarrels about the law . . . After a first and second warning, break off contact with a heretic.  We are to devote ourselves to good works to supply urgent needs. 

The message is clear.  While we strive to follow Christ we cannot expect perfection in or of ourselves.  This perfection can be obtained only in and through Christ . . . because of God’s mercy and compassion and love for each of us.

In this Advent season, when the child comes to live among us . . . we might pause to consider our arguments and our foolish enterprises.  Now is the time to cast off anything which does not lead us to Christ.  It is the time to devote to good works that address urgent needs when all else fails us.  Now is the time to prepare.

Written on December 18, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

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