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Posts Tagged ‘Psalm 126’


Hosea 8The Whirlwind

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Written on May 20, 2010 and posted today as a Favorite . . .

When they sow the wind, they shall reap the whirlwind . . .

Today’s Noontime is about thinking that we are in control and forgetting that God is the creator and manager of all.  It is about making idols of the things we choose as important.  And it is about reaping what we sow.

Psalm 126 is one of my favorites because it reminds us that nothing worthwhile comes to us without suffering; it is in the turmoil and struggle that we best meet God.  Those who sow in tears will reap with cries of joy.  Those who go forth weeping, carrying sacks of seed, will return with cries of joy, carrying their bundled sheaves. 

We cannot go much wrong if when we doubt we remain faithful to our relationship with God.

We cannot go much wrong when if when we are discouraged we place all hope in the timeless healing Christ brings.

We cannot go much wrong when if when we are angry we give our frustration over to the unifying force of the Spirit.

We arrive on the earth with our little bag of seed to be sown.  We search for fertile soil, sometimes forgetting that the best harvest is often reaped under our noses.  We lament the conditions in which we find ourselves; we curse injustice when we hear bad news and we weep as we sow, wondering if anything we do has any positive effect upon outcomes.

Hosea reminds us to stay clear of corruption and deceit.  He tells us clear stories of others who thought they might keep their wicked transactions secret.  He asks us to hug close to home as we labor in the fields, and he suggests that we keep the one true God ever in our hearts and minds.

The wind goes where it likes, symbolizing freedom; yet . . . it is a freedom that comes at a high cost.  Better to remain in the leeward protection of the Lord, Hosea says, so that when the reaper arrives, he will recognize us as those who have toiled long and faithfully in his fields . . . and we not be swept away by the overpowering eddies of the whirlwind.


A re-post from January 15, 2019.

Image from: http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/edu/safety/tornadoguide.html and http://www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-tornado.htm

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Gifts . . . freely given

Jean Restout: The Paraclete

The Seventh Day of Christmas, December 31, 2017

On the seventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me seven swans a-swimming.  

Wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety, fear of God. These seven gifts freely given by the Spirit reside with us – whether we know it or not, and whether we believe it or not. When we least expect it, the Spirit rises to provide us with the tools we need for the circumstances we experience.

Wisdom comes to us with patience and with waiting on the LORD. When we reflect on the persons who hold wisdom, we realize that they listen more than they speak, praise more than they berate, and love more than they disparage. These gifted ones share their wisdom with us, and we do well to share God’s wisdom with others.

Understanding is more than comprehending, more than accepting, and more than believing. Understanding pierces darkness, brings lights, nurtures love in others and enacts love in all. When we practice understanding, we receive more than we expect, and more than we can hold. Understanding grows wherever it resides.

Counsel allows each of us to respond to God’s call no matter how challenging, no matter how awkward, no matter how uncomfortable we may feel. Counsel converts fear into courage. Counsel transforms hatred into love. Those who are open to God’s counsel are better able to see The Way of Christ and to follow.

Fortitude brings us the strength to do what needs to be done when few others will do it. Fortitude brings us the resolution to endure suffering, and to allow God’s hand to convert our suffering into joy. When we allow God’s fortitude to support us in difficult times, we remember Psalm 126: they go out weeping and return rejoicing.

Knowledge of the LORD brings us the foundation on which to stand as we enact the work God calls us to do in this world that struggles to be Kingdom here and now. This gift, perhaps more than any other, allows us to speak and act with authority as Jesus does. Knowledge instructs our decisions, lives in our words, and guides our actions. Knowledge informs our sense of justice and mercy, brings order out of confusion, and love out of hate.

Piety is not a saccharine, duty-bound quality of sweetness; rather, it is love bolstered by God’s power, fidelity strengthened by God’s steadfastness, and hope empowered by God’s promise. Piety is faithful because it makes the choice to persist in God’s love and to believe in God’s covenant. Piety does more than just show up. Piety acts with compassion and patience; and piety is unshakable.

Fear of God is not the experience of anxiety or alarm; it is instead love of God for God’s sake. It demonstrates respect, seeks to worship, and shares joy in the experience of God. One who fears the LORD, stands in awe of God’s goodness and is eager to share the Good News of our rescue from pain and worry.

These seven gifts are more than words. They are tangible forces in our lives. They are stones with which we lay the foundation for our relationship with God. Those who would be wise, are also understanding. Those who give counsel also provide fortitude. Those with knowledge and piety live in awe of God who loves us into creation, and who abides with us even beyond the end of time. On this eve of a new year, we do well to open ourselves to these gifts freely given.

Isaiah 11 describes the Spirit’s gifts as does Paul in his first letter to the Corinthians, Chapter 12.

To learn more about the gifts of the Holy Spirit, visit: http://catholicstraightanswers.com/gifts-holy-spirit/

 

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Ezra 6:18-22Marvels – Part I

2ndtemple

Depiction of the Second Temple

Thursday, November 10, 2016

A Favorite from October 27, 2009.

It must have seemed unreal to the Israelites – after praying for years – to not only return to Jerusalem but also to receive safe passage and assistance from the dynasty which had first overtaken them and then carried them into exile.  The people who had been in darkness were finally seeing a light; the tears they had sown in mourning were about to be harvested in joy.  The dream expressed in Psalm 126 – the response in today’s liturgy – was finally arriving in full force: The Lord has done marvels for us . . . Restore our fortunes, O Lord, like the torrents in the southern desert.  Those that sow in tears shall reap rejoicing . . . The Lord has done marvels for us . . . Although they go forth weeping, carrying the seed to be sown, they shall come back rejoicing, carrying their sheaves . . . The Lord has done marvels for us.

I recently saw a documentary about the men of Wall Street who in the 1920’s first initiated revenue pools with which they manipulated the markets to make exorbitant profits at the expense of small investors.  These wild and risky patterns once unleashed and initially controlled became – as these things always do – beyond all human control.  Ruin and devastation were the result.  What struck me about the information presented was the outcome for two men: one – the original founder of GM – was one who of those really thought that they were in control of the markets.  When he came into NY from his home, the police made certain that all the traffic lights stayed green so that his car would not have to pause on his way to the Exchange.  Everyone was poised to do his bidding and it was perhaps this fawning and deference that deceived him rather than his own pride.  This man ended in complete ruin, still trying to begin a number of small businesses, hoping to “get his game back”.  This man had not seen that his initial success was not his own.  He did not understand that The Lord has done marvels for us. 

A second man was featured who was able to avoid the bursting of the bubble by not only conserving his crookedly gotten treasure but by becoming even wealthier as the world around him collapsed.  But this did not assure his comfort or safety.  Rules were put into place to prevent the gaming of the market and this man became so despondent at the lack of risk and danger in his daily routine that although he died with a mass of money stored up . . . he died at his own hands in a bathroom.  He did not realize that The Lord has done marvels for us.

Tomorrow, the crowd rejoices.

For more about Ezra and the second Temple, click on the image above or visit: http://www.foundationsforfreedom.net/References/OT/Historical/Ezra/Ezra00Intro.html

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Ezra 6:18-22: Marvels – Part I

Friday, October 14, 2016ps-126-5

It must have seemed unreal to the Israelites – after praying for years – to not only return to Jerusalem but also to receive safe passage and assistance from the dynasty which had first overtaken them and then carried them into exile.  The people who had been in darkness were finally seeing a light; the tears they had sown in mourning were about to be harvested in joy.  The dream expressed in Psalm 126 was finally arriving in full force: The Lord has done marvels for us . . . Restore our fortunes, O Lord, like the torrents in the southern desert.  Those that sow in tears shall reap rejoicing . . . The Lord has done marvels for us . . . Although they go forth weeping, carrying the seed to be sown, they shall come back rejoicing, carrying their sheaves . . . The Lord has done marvels for us.

I recently saw a documentary about the men of Wall Street who in the 1920’s first initiated revenue pools with which they manipulated the markets to make exorbitant profits at the expense of small investors.  These wild and risky patterns once unleashed and initially controlled became – as these things always do – beyond all human control.  Ruin and devastation were the result.  What struck me about the information presented was the outcome for two men: one – the original founder of GM – was one who of those really thought that they were in control of the markets.  When he came into NY from his home, the police made certain that all the traffic lights stayed green so that his car would not have to pause on his way to the Exchange.  Everyone was poised to do his bidding and it was perhaps this fawning and deference that deceived him rather than his own pride.  This man ended in complete ruin, still trying to begin a number of small businesses, hoping to “get his game back”.  This man had not seen that his initial success was not his own.  He did not understand that The Lord has done marvels for us. 

A second man was featured who was able to avoid the bursting of the bubble by not only conserving his crookedly gotten treasure but by becoming even wealthier as the world around him collapsed.  But this did not assure his comfort or safety.  Rules were put into place to prevent the gaming of the market and this man became so despondent at the lack of risk and danger in his daily routine that although he died with a mass of money stored up . . . he died at his own hands in a bathroom.  He did not realize that The Lord has done marvels for us.

Tomorrow, splendid deeds. 

Adapted from a Favorite written on October 27, 2009.

 

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James 5:16-17: Praying for Boldness

Sunday, November 1, 2015powerofprayer

The prayer of a person living right with God is something powerful to be reckoned with.

How many of us have witnessed miracles but look for ways to explain them away?

The showers came and everything began to grow again . . .

How many of us have benefited from miracles but shrink from telling others the good news of our own healing?

I’ll bring my people back, gather them up from the ends of the earth . . .

The prophet Jeremiah reminds us that there is always reason to celebrate for those who weep will rejoice, those who are lame will walk, those who are blind will one day see. (Jeremiah 31:7-9)

It seemed like a dream, too good to be true . . .

The psalmists tell us that where we have wept, we will leap for joy. (Psalm 126)

Releasing-the-Power-of-Prayer-VideothumbJust as nature turns and returns in her seasons, so too do we turn and return to God. Perhaps it is her fidelity that brings so many miracles forth in nature’s change each season. Perhaps we might also benefit from turning and returning to God’s word each day. When we spend time with these verses, when we search varying versions of these words, we also find much in the power of righteous prayer. As evening falls and we end our day, let us give thanks to the Lord as we offer all that we are and all that we do in God’s holy, healing name.

Spend time with Acts 4:23-32 and re-read a familiar story about the power of prayer.

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Matthew 5:4 and Luke 6:21: Mourningmourning angel

Holy Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Blessed are they who mourn, for they will be comforted. (Matthew’s account of the Sermon on the Mount)

Blessed are you who are now weeping, for you will laugh. (Luke’s account of the Sermon on the Plain)

God says: When you sink into deepest grief, remember me – for I am with you. When you believe you will never smile again, remain in me – for I live in you. When the darkness is so dense that the light of hope struggles to pierce it, call on me – for I am that light that no darkness can hold back. The prophets foretold and my son retells you that your mourning will become dancing. The psalmist reminds you that those who go out weeping as they carry seed to sow will also return with triumphant sheaves of joy.

As part of our Beatitudes thanksgiving, let us consider how we might bring the gift of presence to someone who mourns the loss of a person, employment, or a lifestyle.

nilmdts_logo1Find out more about the NILMDTS (Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep) organization, a group of photographers whose mission is to introduce remembrance photography to parents suffering the loss of a baby with a free gift of professional portraiture. Visit: https://www.nowilaymedowntosleep.org/

Tomorrow, hunger and thirst.

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