Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Jonathan Maccabeus’


1 Maccabees 12:19-38: In the Face of Great Odds

Friday, December 20, 2019

Jonathan Maccabeus

We have looked at the verses that precede and follow today’s citation, reflecting on friendship and betrayal, on constancy and convolution.  Today we see Jonathan Maccabeus experiencing success as he follows the call of God.  He is later betrayed, but his betrayer suffers a sad end.  We might learn about the kind of patience needed for fidelity when we ponder this story; and we may better understand the need for fortitude and hope when we follow God’s call.  Jonathan’s victory in today’s Noontime comes from his faith in a God who does not abandon his creatures.  Jonathan’s true triumph is not the battles the battles he wins . . . but his commitment to the promise he has made to God.  His true reward is not the fame of the battle won . . . but the serenity of knowing that all is best and all is well when our work is placed in God’s hands.

From today’s Evening Prayer in MAGNIFICAT:

Although you have not seen him you love him; even though you do not see him now yet you believe in him, you rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy.  1 Peter 1:8

Whatever gains I had, these I have come to consider a loss because of Christ.  It is not that I have already taken hold of it or have already attained perfect maturity, but I continue my pursuit in hope that I may possess it, since I have indeed been taken possession of by Christ.  Philippians 3: 7, 12

Although Jonathan did not see God, he loved God and followed his calling . . . even to death.

Whatever gain or loss Jonathan had, he had in God.

May we too, be as constant and as hope-filled as Jonathan . . . even in the face of the greatest odds.


Cameron, Peter John. “Prayer for the Evening.” MAGNIFICAT. 16.11 (2010). Print.  

Written on November 16, 2010 and posted today as a Favorite.

Image from: http://all-generals.ru/index.php?id=1193

Read Full Post »


1 Maccabees 12:1-18: Safe Conduct – Renewing Former Friendships

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini

Amid the war and intrigue of the Old Testament, we may easily overlook the moments when sanity conquers depravity, when diplomacy takes the place of bloodshed.  This is something we may forget once we read it . . . as it seems to happen so seldom.

So often when we are about to embark on a dangerous mission, we search for a letter of introduction, an entrée, an hospitable opening, envoys of safe conduct, forgetting that all the while we already possess these securities . . . in the person of Christ Jesus.  We are never alone when we receive word that we have been assigned to a dangerous mission; we always are accompanied by the one who undertook the most dangerous mission of all . . . confronting Lucifer on his own turf . . . in order to save all of humanity.  Jesus daily takes on an awesome foe . . . that we might be saved from the darkness.

In today’s citation we read about how Jonathon Maccabeus tries to establish diplomatic links with two pagan, strong states.  We notice that he waits until the times favored him.  He does not blunder ahead following his own senses or agenda.  We also notice that he sends selected men.  They are to conform and renew old friendships, old links . . . but not old habits.  Jonathan hopes to find a newness in this resurrected union, just as Jesus finds with us in his New Kingdom.

What are the old relationships we need to resurrect?  Who are our selected emissaries?  Are we overly preoccupied with first finding envoys of safe conduct?  Do we hesitate to begin the trip for fear of failing?

Once we have heard the call to resurrection, an overture must be made; and once made, the outcome of this overture must be left in God’s hands.  If instead of openness and acceptance we receive deceit and rejection, then we know that we must step back to re-evaluate.  Perhaps people and situations have not yet evolved to their harvest time.  Perhaps we ourselves need a bit of repair before stepping again into our mission shoes.

But beyond all of the worry and anxiety about what to do when we feel called to renew an old, and perhaps shaky, friendship . . . we must know that this is the kingdom call.  And we must know . . . that we are never alone.  Christ himself accompanies us as the most seasoned warrior of all time and all creation.

From today’s MAGNIFICAT, page 179: Do not be dismayed by rejection and mockery.  Go forward always, with serenity and fortitude of angels, because you are the angels of the earth and so must continue on your way in the midst of so many contrary influences.  Everyone can be serene when things run smoothly; it is in difficult situations that fidelity and constancy are proven. St. Francis Xavier Cabrini

Fidelity and Constancy . . . the characteristics of a true envoy of safe conduct.  There is no better companion than Christ.


Cameron, Peter John, Rev., ed. “Meditation for the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 13 November 2008: 179. Print.

To read more about Frances Cabrini, click on the image above or go to: http://www.mothercabrini.com/legacy/life1.asp

Written on November 13, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

Read Full Post »


1 Maccabees 11Alliance and War

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Jonathan Maccabeus

Ptolemy VI, Demetrius, Alexander and Trypho – we watch these rulers exchange lies as easily as they shake hands.  Nothing and no one stand for what they say they do; the world into which we step with this Noontime is one of deceit and triple-speak.  It is a world that may seem familiar to us.

In this portion of the Maccabees story, Jonathan knows that his tiny kingdom is a simple pawn in the chessboard of the region yet he persists in his struggle to retain and hold secure the sacred city of Jerusalem and some districts of the former kingdom.  He seems to achieve and hold his goal . . . at least for a while.

Alliance and war, promise and conflict, peace and confrontation – these larger battles are reflections of the personal battles we wage each day.  The Euro-zone struggles, personal freedom is or is not guaranteed in Egypt, the debt crisis in the U.S. causes financial markets to totter; corruption in political and financial arenas is blamed for personal, national and global failure and depression.  News headlines today read much like this Maccabees accounting.  What has changed?

We like to think that humanity makes progress and our inventions might give us the impression that we do.  We communicate with one another across the globe in an instant; but do we hear one another any better?  We cure diseases that previously devastated entire nations; but do we cure the disease of greed and alienation?  We have world-wide conferences that give the appearance of ecumenism and openness; but do we tend to the soul any better than we did two thousand years ago?

Amid the hurley burley of human activity there is only one place to go when headlines distress us or when family and friends become prickly or insensitive.  The last verse of the chapter tells us where to go and what to do . . . Then Jonathan returned to Jerusalem. High Priest-Warrior who follows in the footsteps of his slain brother Judas, Jonathan makes it clear where his center lies . . . he returns to Jerusalem.  Steadfast diplomat who manages to maneuver the tricks and fall backs of his opponents, Jonathan refuses shady deals and shaky terms to make clear where he focuses his energy . . . he returns to Jerusalem Through alliance and war, despite political setback and personal failure, Jonathan Maccabeus shoots like an arrow straight and true.  He homes toward the epicenter of his faith and hope . . . he returns to Jerusalem. 

And so we pray . . .

Good and faithful God, abide with us as we worry our way through our days.  Keep us true to you as we avoid the temptation to give in to a false and passing alliance that brings nothing but death.  Teach us how to remain in touch with you when the clamor of the day and the fear of the night dull our senses and attacks our resolve.  Speak to us loudly and clearly when the road signs that point toward you have been washed away by slick talk and deceitful hands.  Pull us to you and hold us close when our inner turmoil and fear erode our confidence and hope. Keep us ever mindful of your care and love . . . and remind us that when the stricture of alliance clouds our vision or when the fog of war numbs our good judgment . . . we have only to cry out to you and ask that you return us to the safety of Jerusalem.  For it is there that we find eternal rest and boundless peace in you.  Amen. 


A re-post from November 23, 2011.

Image from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Apphus

For more information on Jonathan Maccabeus you might try these sites:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/353845/Jonathan-Maccabeus

 http://www.jewishhistory.org/the-hasmoneans/

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: