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Posts Tagged ‘prophecy’


Jeremiah 51Adjusting to Reality

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

“Jeremiah sends a ‘book’ of oracles against Babylon to Babylon with Baruch’s brother in about 594.  These are to be read publicly and then tied to a stone and cast into the Euphrates, symbolizing Babylon’s fate . . . It has been suggested that the original intention of Jeremiah’s action was to rebut the prophecies of Ahab and Zedekiah to the effect that the exile would be short (see 29:4-9, 20-23).  On this interpretation, reading and then destroying a set of anti-Babylonian prophecies would have the effect of stressing Jeremiah’s rejection of this optimistic view”.  (Mays 576)

Jeremiah knows that the exile will be long and harsh . . . yet no one believes him because it does not coincide with the false view many find easier to hold.  It seems that nothing much has changed in the intervening millennia since this story; we humans would rather cling to the falsehood that matches our view rather than change our thinking to the truth.  Today’s citation tells us that it is better to adjust ourselves to reality because no amount of manipulation or coercion will hide the obvious.   My dad liked to say: The truth comes out in the end so we might as well get used to it as soon as we can.

In today’s case, Jeremiah accurately predicts that even the conquerors will themselves be conquered and he predicts an unpleasant winnowing.   The imagery is brutal, the devastation complete.  There is no escaping the consequences that result from greed, corruption, and mollification.  The prophet Jeremiah sees collusion between his own leaders and those who of Israel’s pagan neighbors and while the “optimistic view” cited above may be popular, it is not honest. And so Jeremiah outs the lies.  He does as God asks and sends his prophecies to Babylon via the brother of his secretary, Baruch.

It is difficult to speak truth with respect, to express candor gently; and it may, in fact, even place us in danger.  When we see that everyone around us chooses to believe a myth created by the powerful and wealthy, we must speak honestly but with mercy no matter the cost to us.  It is in this way that we adjust ourselves to reality rather than follow the fashionable fairy story.  It is in this way that we honor ourselves and others who speak truth.  It is in this way that we praise and honor our God.

From today’s first reading at Mass, The Feast of Jesus’ Transfiguration, 2 Peter 1:16-19: Beloved: We did not follow cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we have been eyewitnesses of his majesty.  For he received honor and glory from God the Father when that unique declaration came to him from majestic glory, “This is my Son, my beloved with whom I am well pleased”.  We ourselves heard this voice . . . Moreover, we possess the prophetic message that is altogether reliable.  You will do well to be attentive to it, as to a lamp shining in a dark place until day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts”. 

Peter knows that he cannot remain silent about the story he has witnessed and, like Jeremiah, he knows that he must speak so that others might adjust to the amazing reality that what seems impossible is real, that we are created and loved by God and that God wants nothing but goodness for us and from us.  We are called to seek truth, to cling to it and to celebrate it with others who are willing to adjust their vision to be in line with God’s.

Once we cease nodding in idiotic agreement with the myths woven by those who are vested in them, we will see and know God’s truth, and we will not be silenced.  We too, will write out the prophecy that God commands . . . and we will adjust ourselves to God’s vision.


Mays, James L., ed.  HARPERCOLLINS BIBLE COMMENTARY. New York, New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1988. 576. Print.

A re-post from August 6, 2011.

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Luke 13:31-35: Gathering Children

Tuesday, November 1, 2016pp-lsh0007mother-hen-posters1

We know the importance of prophecy in God’s kingdom. We know the importance of the prophets themselves as God’s emissaries to the world. And we know that each of us is called to act as one of these messengers. How did Jesus recognize this work?

God says: Just because I call you to work in my vineyard does not mean that the work will be easy. Indeed, it is very likely to be the most difficult portion of your labor for me. My Word comes to earth as human flesh and finds itself rejected in the very heart of the people I have chosen as my own. I have wandered with you for millennia and still you doubt me. I have brought endless miracles to you and still you ask for signs. I have loved you as my own and still you turn away from me. Yet I love you endlessly. I always have since the beginning of time. I always will. I love every portion of you and each of you. There is no place you might go that I do not perceive you for together you are my very Spirit. Rest in me when you are weary. Rest in me when you are anxious. Rest in me when you celebrate and shout for joy. Rest in me always and everywhere.

Jesus says: Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how many times I yearned to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, but you were unwilling!

And we, the people, say: Oh good and loving God, we know that we doubt too often and mourn too long. Each day and in every way we want to return to you. Be patient with us as we flounder. Be strong for us as we waver. Be faithful to us as we stray. Gather us, your children, under your wings as a mother hen gathers her brood; and remain in us forever. We ask this in Jesus’ name. Amen.

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Zechariah 14: Apocalypse – Part V

The Sistine Chapel, The Vatican: Michelangelo's Prophet Zechariah

The Sistine Chapel, The Vatican: Michelangelo’s Prophet Zechariah

Saturday, June 6, 2015

The fight for Jerusalem that Zechariah predicts is already begun . . . and we are celebrants in the newness of what is coming into being.  Let us gather ourselves to face the disasters that life brings to us, for it is in these disasters that we find this new life. Let us find our places in God’s new city, for it is in this new place that we find new meaning. And let us rejoice and be glad for we know what to do when cataclysm strikes; it is in this cataclysm that we discover the refuge that is the house of the Lord of hosts.

Past, present, future. Let us step forward into the newness of our transformation. Past, present and future. Let us step away from our childish predictions of a future that is too simple. Past, present and future. Let us rest in the moment when we fully experience the three-person God who is more real and more certain than any savior we might conjure up on our own. Let us rest in the present to celebrate the God who always was, always is and always will be the peace and hope and joy of the world.

Enter the word restoration into the blog search bar and explore the idea of cataclysm bringing joy into our lives. 

Tomorrow, the feast of Corpus Christi.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990. 425. Print.   

Adapted from a reflection written on Friday, July 10, 2009.

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Zechariah 14: Apocalypse – Part IVcorpuschristi

Friday, June 5, 2015

Return from exile is celebrated but the celebration is taking place amid the ruin of former glory because our newness is more important than what was. In our child-like, dual minds we see the world as negative and positive, off or on, with or against, good or evil, black or white, up or down. When we give ourselves over to our Triune God we begin to understand that these opposites exist side by side and even intertwined. We also begin to see that God’s plan, God’s promise and God’s love are capable of turning any harm – natural or human-made – into a force for beauty and goodness. This is the promise of the Easter resurrection, and it is the miracle of Pentecost indwelling.

We are nearing the Feast of Corpus Christi when we celebrate this gift of Jesus’ presence in gift of Eucharist. I will feed my people with finest wheat and fill them with honey from the rock (Psalm 81:16) We are one with Christ in the gift of bread and wine. Amen, amen, I say to you, whoever believe this has eternal life. I am the bread of life. Your ancestors ate the manna in the desert, but they died; this is the bread that comes from heaven so that one may eat it and not die. (John 6:47-50)

We have been transformed and made anew, and this miracle of redemption that Zechariah describes already exists today in that each of us is the libation bowl poured out for Christ.  We are each a vessel fashioned by God’s hands and brought into existence for God’s purpose.  We each are the hope of the Spirit to the world.

Past present, future. Let us remember the holy trinity of our lives: all that God has created and gifted, all that is here with us in the Spirit, and all that is promised by Christ in our lives to come. Then, when apocalypse befalls us, let us offer all that we have and all that we are to the triune God: courageous creator, compassionate savior and blessed comforter.

To read about how different cultures celebrate the Feast of Corpus Christi, click on the image above or visit: http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/common/corpus-christi

Tomorrow, transformation.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990. 425. Print.   

Adapted from a reflection written on Friday, July 10, 2009.

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Zechariah 14: Apocalypse – Part III

Recovery from disaster in Japan in 2011

Recovery from disaster in Japan in 2011

Thursday, June 4, 2015

The process of restoration has only just begun and Zechariah speaks to us today to give us a moment to reflect on the meaning of our own return from personal exile.  The prophet gives us a framework in which to put our lives, a microscope to examine ourselves as we put our lives into proper perspective. And Zechariah gives us a reason to rejoice and celebrate . . . even in the midst of ruins. Zechariah gives us an opportunity to gather our forces for the next phase of work, the next leg in our journey.

Past, present, future. Let us celebrate the holy trinity of our lives: the eternal rock of fidelity that God is, the bottomless well of compassion that the Spirit offers, the infinity of love that Christ promises and with which he heals. When disaster is on our doorstep, let us remember that we are of, from and in God. Let us remember that there is no calamity that will ever overtake us, no cataclysm will ever erase us from existence, and no apocalypse that will ever separate us from God.

Click on the image and visit the National Geographic page describing natural disasters as a part of human life. learn how shoring up natural ecosystems can help to protect us: http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/sustainable-earth/disasters/

Tomorrow, Zechariah predicts our newness.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990. 425. Print.   

Adapted from a reflection written on Friday, July 10, 2009.

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Zechariah 14: Apocalypse – Part IItrinity knot

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

The last chapter of Zechariah’s prophecy makes a momentous revelation or announcement: There will be an end to prophecy.  Perhaps this is because with the coming of the Messianic age there is little need to announce the savior who is already among us. Perhaps it is because prophets have lost their place of status. Perhaps it is because people of all nations, including pagan ones, will now worship the Lord.  In any case, according to Zechariah, the fight will be over.  There will no longer be merchants in the house of the Lord; false shepherds will have disappeared; the tribes of the world will be reconciled; peace will reign.

Past, present and future merge as Zechariah pulls us out of our mourning for what is over and in the past, away from our fears for the future that has yet to come . . . and into the promise of the present where God is. Let us rely on the holy trinity in our lives on this day in this hour at this moment: marvelous God who created us, audacious Christ who saved us, and passionate Spirit who abides within. And let us want and fear nothing.

Enter the word apocalypse into the blog search bar and explore, or follow the pathways in the trinity know image above and consider not only the interlocking relationship of our three-person God, but the end of false shepherds and prophets, the end of lies and deceit. How do we recognize truth in its fullness when it stands before us? How will we return this truth to the world? 

Tomorrow, Zechariah describes an end to prophecy.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.425. Print.   

Adapted from a reflection written on Friday, July 10, 2009.

 

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Zechariah 14: Apocalypse – Part Itrinity-310931_640

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Apocalypse, coming from the Greek for revelation, is an announcement of a truth revealed.  Apocalyptic literature is full of mystery, is usually veiled in symbolic language and is often interpreted by an angel of God (Senior 425).  It deals with the heavenly world, the future, and describes a final judgment in which there are winners and losers.  It is sometimes incomprehensible, frightening and misunderstood.  The Apocalypse we see in today’s reading is the fight for Jerusalem which ushers in an era without storm, turmoil or deceit.  It brings a time of peace, unity and celebration.  It is a day when every libation pot shall be holy to the Lord.

Past, present, future. Let us remember the holy trinity of our lives: all that God has created and gifted, all that is here with us in the Spirit, and all that is promised by Christ in our lives to come. In this way we will know what to do and what to say when apocalypse befalls us, as it surely will. And let us offer all that we have and all that we are to the triune God: courageous creator, compassionate savior and blessed comforter.

Tomorrow, more from Zechariah.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990. 425. Print.   

Adapted from a reflection written on Friday, July 10, 2009.

For interesting insights into apocalyptic beliefs, their evolution and how they shaped the western world, visit the PBS Frontline page at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/apocalypse/ 

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Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Prayer[1]Daniel 10:12

Visions

Fear not.  From the first day you made up your mind to acquire understanding and humble yourself before God, your prayer was heard. 

The prophecy of Daniel is full of metaphor, symbolism and mystery and yet it is in this prophecy that we see the coming of the Son of Man predicted. (Daniel 7:13 and 8:17) Today we reprise the mysterious vision that presages so much fear and so much hope.

God says: I see that you are determined to follow me and this brings me joy.  I also see the pitfalls and obstacles in your way and this brings me sorrow.  I abide with you as always.  I accompany you through fire, pain and death.  I raise you up when you are fallen.  I restore you when are spent.  I rescue you when fire consumes you.  Did I not save my servant Daniel?  Are you not as important as he?  Read this story of Daniel and humble yourself as Daniel does.  Trust in me as this young man does.  Acquire knowledge of me as this young prophet does for you are destined to be as significant as any prophet of mine in the days of old.  Each of you is precious in my eyes.  Each of you has the potential to prophesy for me.  Each of you is welcome to take refuge in the limitless safety of my most sacred heart.  When you shelter with me your smallness expands to the boundless horizons of my mind.  When you remain in me your fears and anxieties become the sinews of my protective arms.  When you act in me your tears and sorrows dissolve into mists that nourish the dry nights of the soul.  Read about Daniel’s visions today, bring me requests, and give yourself hope for many tomorrows.  Know that I hear every prayer you utter in the turmoil of the day, in the shadows of night, in the company for friends or in the solitary stillness of your heart. 

To further explore the visions of Daniel, enter his name in the blog search bar and choose another reflection.

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Friday, April 19, 2013

Jesus%20with%20the%20Disciples_discipleship[1]Matthew 13:16-17 – Privilege

Discipleship work is the fulfillment of Old Testament covenant.  It is arduous and difficult work fueled by God’s promise to ancient peoples.

Discipleship work is the flourishing of the voices of the prophets.  It is expectant waiting rising from God’s promise to faithful servants.

Discipleship work is full of conflict.  It is all raw edges and bare emotion.  It is holding one’s self in and pouring one’s self out in the same crucible moment.

Discipleship work is full of power.  It is primal force reckoning with modern circumstances. It is the bowing to God’s omniscience and authority while loving God’s marginalized.

Discipleship work is chaotic and serene.  It is point counterpoint all in one graceful movement.  It is dire and blessed.  Dangerous and supremely secure.  It is human and divine.

dare-to-be-a-disciple-story-3-pic[1]Discipleship work is God’s work.  It is our sublime celebration of Easter.

Discipleship work is our full service to God’s humanity.  It is the highest of callings.

Discipleship is sorrow.

Discipleship is joy.

Discipleship is privilege.  Purely and simple.  Clearly and authentically.

Let us respond to God’s call to discipleship with readiness, zeal, and joy.

Tomorrow we will begin to reflect on the gifts we receive through our work as disciples.  We begin with Meekness.

For more reflections on our unique privilege of service to God, go to the blog search box and enter the words Disciple or Discipleship.

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