Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘God heals’


Ezekiel 24:15-27Destruction

Saturday, November 17, 2018

The first 40 books of this prophesy are written predicting the doom and fall  of Jerusalem; and Ezekiel was mocked for believing that the impregnable Jerusalem – jealously guarded by Yahweh – would fall to the pagans.  History reminds us that in 597 B.C.E. Nebuchadnezzar and his troops swarmed into the city and violated the temple, sacking it, killing the Jewish soldiers, taking Jewish captives and carting off all that had value to Babylon.  The Jewish nation had lived too long in false security, thinking for too long that they were unbeatable as a kingdom . . . invincible as a nation . . . indestructible as a people.  They had not understood that it was their own actions that threatened their safety rather than the foreign troops.  Their refusal to adhere to the spirit and the letter of the Mosaic Law had left them vulnerable.

It is too often that as humans we do not realize our lack of understanding until we lose what we hold most dear; that is why there is something recognizable in the eyes of a fellow mourner that tells us when our sadness is truly felt by another.  It is impossible to counterfeit soul-wrenching mourning . . . nothing deceives those who have lost . . . those who have grieved.  Like the witnesses to Ezekiel’s dumbness and numbness, we cannot empathize with grief or sorrow until we ourselves have experienced deep loss.  This is human nature, for it is not until we exit from mourning that we find ourselves immutably changed.  After exile, we forever recognize honest grieving when we see it.  We do not fully and totally take in the fugitive . . . until we are bereft of all we know.

In today’s reading, we see Ezekiel’s stalwart attempt to obey Yahweh.  We watch his effort to hide his grief.  We cannot take our eyes from the drama of his transformation because somehow we understand that from this day forward the Diaspora will believe his predictions, will begin to heed his words, will try to put away their pride and anger . . . will learn to leave themselves open to the healing redemption of their God.

Ezekiel is eventually vindicated, but not until the nation has begun their northward journey into the unknown.  Ezekiel suffers great loss, but in so doing he opens himself to his mourning people . . . and accompanies them into exile.

When we find ourselves on our knees with no where lower to sink . . . we must listen for the voice that says to us . . . All sanctuaries are desecrated . . . yet you are my favored one . . . the one I send to my people . . . to accompany them in their exile. 

God turns all harm to good.  God heals, saves, and redeems.  God asks us to enter into the miracle of transforming the destruction with him, to join in the healing.  When God calls us, we must respond.  When we are sent as ministers to his flock, we must go.  When the walls of the city are impregnated and the temple gold is taken, rather than wrapping ourselves in deep mourning, let us keep our sandals on our feet, leave our turbans on our heads . . . and leave behind the pride of our hearts.  We are called to enter into a fugitive life to live for a time in which we find our sole sustenance in God.  For by this sign, the lost sheep will know that God is with them.


A re-post from October 15, 2011.

Image from: http://www.biblesearchers.com/yahshua/passovertrial/cosmicdrama.shtml

Read Full Post »


Leviticus 19:17-18: Loving Others – Part I

Tuesday, November 22, 2016christ-for-muslims

Don’t secretly hate your neighbor. If you have something against him, get it out into the open; otherwise you are an accomplice in his guilt. Don’t seek revenge or carry a grudge against any of your people. Love your neighbor as yourself. I am God. (MSG)

We have spent time with these verses before but we do well to spend a bit of time with again.

Do not bear a grudge against others, but settle your differences with them, so that you will not commit a sin because of them. Do not take revenge on others or continue to hate them, but love your neighbors as you love yourself. I am the Lord. (GNT)

We have reflected before on the importance of loving those who hate and we do well to reflect again.

You shall not hate your fellow countryman in your heart; you may surely reprove your neighbor, but shall not incur sin because of him. You shall not take vengeance, nor bear any grudge against the sons of your people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself; I am the Lord. (NASB)

God says: I know how difficult my Law of Love can be for you, especially when you have enemies who seek to bring about your end. Especially when others envy, hate, persecute and even kill you. There are times in your lives that are too difficult for you and that is fine. Bring me the injustice that plagues you. Bring me the worries that possess you. Bring me your sadness that threatens to destroy you. And bring me any joy you may have found in our journey over the last days – it does not matter how small it is. And if you have no happiness at all, just bring me yourself. I long to heal you. I long to console you. I long to hold you and call you my own. I long to be one with you.

For millennia the Lord has told us how we are to act when our sisters and brothers hate us.

Do not hate your brother in your heart, but rebuke your neighbor frankly, so that you won’t carry sin because of him. Don’t take vengeance on or bear a grudge against any of your people; rather, love your neighbor as yourself; I am Adonai. (CJB)

For millennia to come the Lord will abide, heal and comfort us, his little children. Let us behave each day as though we believe this to be so.

When we use the scripture link and drop-down menus to explore these words, we begin to understand that God knows how difficult the human life can be; we begin to recognize just how much we are loved; and we begin to find a way to return the great love we are given to a world waiting for healing.

Read Full Post »


Genesis 29-35: God’s Yardstick – Rachel

Persistent Hope

William Dyce: Rachel and Jacob

William Dyce: Rachel and Jacob

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

In these opening days of a new year, we look for ways to better see God’s yardstick in our lives, and for ways to leave the world’s yardstick behind.

It is a great irony that Jacob, who duped his brother Esau, is duped by his uncle Laban who substitutes the older daughter Leah for the younger daughter Rachel on Jacob and Rachel’s wedding night. Jacob served Laban for seven years in the hope of marrying Rachel whom he loved. The veiled Leah is ushered into the marriage bed by her father. Jacob must work an additional seven years in order that he might also marry Rachel. This quick summary tells about the facts as described by the writers of Genesis but it leaves to our imagination the sentiment between these people. We can only imagine the emotional roller coaster of each person in this story. Today we reflect on Rachel and the yardstick she must have used to manoeuver a path through her complicated life.

When we find ourselves embroiled in family arguments . . . we remember that God will always heal great wounds.

So Jacob served seven years for Rachel, yet they seemed to him like a few days because of his love for her. (Genesis 29:20)

When we feel that life holds no promise or grace . . . we remember that with God all things are possible.

Then God remembered Rachel. God listened to her and made her fruitful. She conceived and bore a son, and she said, “God has removed my disgrace.” She named him Joseph, saying, “May the Lord add another son for me!” (Genesis 30:22)

When we find that life and death occupy the same space and time . . . we remember that God is the author of all life, of life eternal.

Rachel went into labor and suffered great distress.  With her last breath—for she was at the point of death—she named him Ben-oni (son of my vigor); but his father named him Benjamin. (Genesis 35:16-18)

When we feel that our existence on earth has had little or no meaning . . . we remember that with God there is always healing and inversion.

Francesco Furini: Death of Rachel

Francesco Furini: Death of Rachel

Thus Rachel died; and she was buried on the road to Ephrath (now Bethlehem). Jacob set up a sacred pillar on her grave, and the same pillar marks Rachel’s grave to this day. (Genesis 35:19-20)

When we are unclear about how to move forward through great adversity . . . we remember the story of Rachel . . . and we see God’s yardstick in her life.

When we use the scripture link to compare various versions of this story, we allow these verses to show us God’s yardstick in our own lives.

To learn more about Rachel, click on the image above, or visit: http://www.womeninthebible.net/1.4.Rachel.htm

Read Full Post »


Monday, August 19, 2013

sun on hoizon of planet

John 12:44-46

The One

Jesus cried out and said, “Whoever believes in me believes not only in me but also in the one who sent me.  I came into the world as light, so that everyone who believes in me might not remain in darkness”.

We often hear the question: Where was God when this tragedy happened?  Today we hear an answer.

God says: I hear you when you ask, “Where are you, God?” And when I hear this I hear it I know that you are frightened.  I walk among you every day and most of the time I am invisible to you.  Perhaps you are looking for a powerful leader, a doctor, a wise one who has all the answers to your questions.  If this is the one you seek, you seek me.  But I do not look powerful.  My healing of your wounds and ills is often taken for granted.  And my advice to you is regularly ignored. But this does not anger me for I am patient and my love for you is wider, deeper and more intense than you have imagined.  I walk with you each day in the darkest of places to bring you light.  I carry you through the night to set you in the sunshine. I bind up your injuries and restore your body, mind and soul.  I am The One who created you and I am The One who tends to you.  Even when you cry out against me I am there.

We seek God and look past his presence because God often comes to us as the battered, the homeless and the bereft.  God speaks to us through inversion and hears our cries.  Rather than shun the light of truth, we must be open to it.  Rather than close the door to uncomfortable information, we must welcome it.  Rather than deny growth and transformation, we must embrace it.  For this is how God comes to us each hour of each day.

Read Full Post »


Tuesday, July 2, 2013

in%20gods%20light%20600[1]

Linda Duferrena: In God’s Light

1 John 1:5 & 2:1,5

God as Light

Now this is the message that we have heard and proclaim to you: God is light, and in God there is no darkness at all.  My children, I am writing this to you so that you may not commit sin.  But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous one.  Whoever keeps God’s word, the love of God is truly perfected in him.  This is the way we know that we are in union with God: whoever claims to abide in God ought to live just as Jesus lived.

Light first parts the darkness and calls order out of chaos.  Light is both visible and invisible.  Light travels at high velocity and yet has eternal permanence. Light creeps into murky corners and reveals all that is hidden.  Light heals what ails us and calls us to perfection.  Light comes to us from billions  of stars.  Light emanates from those who persist in following God.

God says: When you falter, do not hide from me.  I see you anyway.  When you worry, bring me your problems.  My shoulders are broad.  When you stray and err, come to me immediately.  I want to settle you into my heart and heal you of all that brings you pain or grief.  Come to me always.  I am the light that sees and orders and reconciles all.   

Perfection is such a high standard that we are easily convinced that we are unworthy. Yet God calls us to a generous heart that loves persistence and fidelity.  Rather than shrink from the brightness and truth of God when we have gone wrong, let us move toward the light that transforms us.

Enter the word darkness into the blog search bar and reflect on how God pierces the darkness on order to save us.

For more about the images of desert Nevada, U.S.A. by Linda Duferrena, click on the image above or go to: http://www.lindadufurrena.com/index.html

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: