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Posts Tagged ‘inversion’


Wednesday, September 30, 2020

1 Peter 1:17-19

Lamb_of_God_smReverence

Now if you invoke as father him who judges partially according to each one’s works, conduct yourselves with reverence during the tome of your sojourning, realizing that you were ransomed from your futile conduct, handed on by your ancestors, not with perishable things like silver or gold but with the precious blood of Christ as of a spotless unblemished lamb.

The Jewish symbol of life is the blood of the spotless lamb.  This symbol becomes reality when Christ dies so that each of us might live.

God says: I can see why you do not understand the world of inversion in which I operate. You are often confused when Jesus tells you that you must die in order that you might live. But look at the world around you. As Jesus says: a grain of wheat must fall to the ground and split open. It must die from its present state in order that it produce many more grains. In this way the grain of wheat you see as perishing is, in fact, becoming immortal. It never dies because for generations its offspring live. Just so is it with each of you. Like the grain of wheat that gives over to the potential I have placed within, so too do you live forever when you follow your call and enter into the potential state for which I created you. When this becomes your reality . . . suddenly the world of inversion is the only world that makes sense. This is why Jesus tells you: “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit”.  John 12:24

It is not necessary for us to bear physical children in order to enter into this world that Jesus describes; rather, each small and tender act we offer up to God is a small child of love to which we give birth. Just so does Christ offer himself to us each day as the innocent lamb. Just so do we realize our true inheritance in Christ rather than in gold and silver that perishes. Just so do we revere our God by offering reverence to God and to one another in our small and big acts of inversion.

Tomorrow, mutual love . . .


Image from: http://www.crossroadsinitiative.com/library_article/427/jesus___lamb_of_god_.html

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Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Luke 18:31-34

Comprehension

“Luke understands the events of Jesus’ last days in Jerusalem to be the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy, but, as is usually the case in Luke-Acts, the author does not specify which Old Testament prophets he has in mind”.   (Senior 133 cf.)

Many of us live much of our lives in this way: we do as God asks with the understanding that that we are fulfilling some needed action . . . without fully comprehending how our small part fits in with God’s great plan. Discipleship is characteristically vague in this way, asking us to rely in faith on God, asking us to rest in hope with God, asking us to act in love for God.

Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem . . .

Each time we feel God’s desire move through us we know that we are going up to Jerusalem.

The Son of Man will be handed over . . .

Each time we follow Christ we understand that we run the risk of being handed over to the scoffers, the naysayers, the plotters and the complacent.

He will be mocked and insulted and spat upon . . .

Each time we lament that disciple work is difficult we put aside the memory of Jesus’s last days.

After they have scourged him they will kill him . . .

Each time we die another small death we believe we have no more energy to move forward.

But on the third day he will rise . . .

Each time we think we are extinguished forever we rise in restoration and healing.

But they understood nothing of this . . .

Each time we try to explain the reasons for our outrageous hope we meet expressionless faces.

And the word remained hidden from them . . .

Each time we come up against the wall of incomprehension we must remember that even those who followed Jesus day to day did not fully understand . . . until Christ returned to them following the events of his Passion and death.

And they failed to comprehend what he said . . .

Each time we believe that we are lost we must remember that God always acts through inversion and so the lost will be found.

Each time we fall Christ is there – even though we do not comprehend.

Each time we suffer Christ is there – even though we do not understand.

Each time we die one of those many small deaths that mark our passing, Christ is there – even though we do not fully see.


Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.133. Print.   

Enter the words Going Up to Jerusalem – A Prayer into the blog search bar and explore another reflection. To better understand the expression, enter the words Going Up to Jerusalem and visit the three-part post.

To read about Jerusalem Day and the crowds who pray at the southern wall of the Temple, click on the image above or go to: http://blog.friendlyplanet.com/2013/03/the-top-10-places-and-sites-to-visit-in-israel.html

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020

sun on hoizon of planet

John 12:44-46

The One

Jesus cried out and said, “Whoever believes in me believes not only in me but also in the one who sent me.  I came into the world as light, so that everyone who believes in me might not remain in darkness”.

We often hear the question: Where was God when this tragedy happened?  Today we hear an answer.

God says: I hear you when you ask, “Where are you, God?” And when I hear this I hear it I know that you are frightened. I walk among you every day and most of the time I am invisible to you. Perhaps you are looking for a powerful leader, a doctor, a wise one who has all the answers to your questions. If this is the one you seek, you seek me. But I do not look powerful. My healing of your wounds and ills is often taken for granted. And my advice to you is regularly ignored. But this does not anger me for I am patient and my love for you is wider, deeper and more intense than you have imagined. I walk with you each day in the darkest of places to bring you light. I carry you through the night to set you in the sunshine. I bind up your injuries and restore your body, mind and soul. I am The One who created you and I am The One who tends to you. Even when you cry out against me I am there.

We seek God and look past his presence because God often comes to us as the battered, the homeless and the bereft. God speaks to us through inversion and hears our cries. Rather than shun the light of truth, we must be open to it. Rather than close the door to uncomfortable information, we must welcome it. Rather than deny growth and transformation, we must embrace it. For this is how God comes to us each hour of each day.


Image from: http://catechesis-a-journey.blogspot.com/2012/10/creation.html

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Saturday, August 8, 2020

two-edged-sword[1]Revelation 1:16

Cleaving God’s Word

In his right hand [the son of man] held seven stars. A sharp, two-edged sword came out of his mouth, and his face shone like the sun at its brightest. 

Commentary tells us that the seven stars represent the pagan authority over the world in which the writer, John of Patmos, lived.  The sword refers to the Word of God.  The shining face represents the divine mystery of Christ. (Senior cf. 401)

God says: Like the vineyard owner who sends his son to gather the rent, I have sent my own son among you for your acceptance of rejection. This son is My Word to you. His actions are mine. His love is mine.  All that he is and all that he does speak My Word and in this he is constant and faithful. Sometimes he brings you fire. Sometimes he brings you tranquility. Always he brings you justice tempered with mercy, mercy enacted through justice yet it is not always easy to hear this word. My son always brings you healing. Always brings you transformation. Always brings prudence and persistence. This double edge may be difficult for some to understand yet it describes my son’s nature and thus my nature.  t both divides and unites. It harvests where it can. Live by the word brought to you on this double edge. Imitate this two-edged sword as best you can for it is in this fusion of two worlds that you find me. It is in the inversion of your world that you best feel my presence.

In Ephesians 6:17 Paul writes of this sword of the spirit, the word of God, that sings as it completes the armor of the steadfast servant. As we arm ourselves today and all days to go into the world, let us remember that God’s word cleaves the faithful – it both divides and unites.  Let us spend time with God today to determine how we react to the fire and restoration brought to us by the two-edged sword of God’s Word.


Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990. 401. Print.   

The Parable of the Tenants: Matthew 21:33-46

Image from: https://www.bing.com

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Thursday, August 6, 2020Two Edged SwordPsalm 149:6

The Double-Edged Sword

With the praise of God in their mouths, and a two-edged sword in their hands . . .

With mercy and justice, compassion and integrity, love and honesty the double-edged sword of God sings in the hands of God’s people.  Let us praise God.

God says: I understand how difficult it is for you to wield this special sword when you see only a small part of the broad landscape of the time and place that I see.  Yet you are my special and dear children and for that reason I cannot refuse you this sword of redeeming life.  When you are discouraged from struggling with the world, take up the sword and grasp it firmly. When you feel that you are bullied because of me, lift the sword and allow it to sing.  When you find that you are weighed down with my justice, raise the sword and join your voice in the song of the double-edged sword.

We humans tend to be dualistic; we find life easier to live when we look through a single lens that filters out opposing views.  We have difficulty balancing opposites yet we lose our way when we see events and people through the lens of our own singular thinking.  God is always showing us a world of inversion: the poor are wealthy, the wealthy poor; what is lost is found, what is found is lost; we are born to die, we die in order to be born anew.  This two-edged sword that separates and yet joins is a living sign of God’s presence in our lives.  Let us celebrate our struggles and take up our burden with joy.  And let us learn a lesson of great value as we ponder God’s double-edged sword.


For practical advice on the use of the two-edged sword, click on the image above or go to: http://lifeworthserving.wordpress.com/2011/04/11/praying-the-word/

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Friday, July 31, 2020

God-purpose-revival[1]Isaiah 57:15

Revival

For thus says he who is high and exalted, living eternally, whose name is the Holy One: On high I dwell, and in holiness, and with the crushed and dejected in spirit, to revive the spirits of the dejected, to revive the hearts of the crushed. 

We are accustomed to thinking of the high and exalted as above all who are weary and disheartened from the stress of their labor.  We usually think of rulers as those who set themselves apart from the common masses.  Our societies today reflect this thinking. Isaiah conveys comforting words from the One who is Lord of all to those who are afflicted.

God says: Isaiah tells you that I live on high and this is true; yet I dwell with you.  I raise you up to live in me.  Isaiah also tells you that I live with you who are crushed and weary; and this is also true.  My favorite dwelling is with those who have no hope.  Do you see the inversion that I bring to you?  I live with those who are rejected and lowly, and raise them up.  I revive those who have a darkened spirit.  I live through those with a tired heart. My shoulders are broad and my spirit willing; my heart encompasses the universe; I am eternal.  And it is to this eternity, this holiness, this revival that I carry you.  Allow me to heal all that weighs you down.

This is no false promise.  God always reverses what we humans see as the natural order and God wants to transform weary hearts into hearts afire with eternal love.


Enter the words inversion or God’s heart into the blog search bar and continue to explore.

Image from: http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/thabitianyabwile/2013/07/23/are-you-the-kind-of-person-god-uses-for-revival/ 

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Friday, July 17, 2020

The-least-of-things-with-a-meaning-is-worth-more-in-life-than-the-greatest-of-things-without-it.[1]Job 8:21

At First Glance

Once more God will fill your mouth with laughter, and your lips with rejoicing.

In a world that yearns for the best, the most, the highest, the tallest, the greatest in all things, we lose sight of the tiny and what appears to be unimportant.  God’s plan always works through inversion; God transforms our suffering and brings forth joy; God calls the smallest of us for the greatest of tasks.  We have the choice to choose the false life of bigness or the eternal life of the seemingly insignificant.

God says: Do you not see the many little miracles in which you take part with me each day?  I know. The same blindness overcame the first apostles until I sent them out in twos to heal and cure.  They, like you, are still surprised when I invite them to join me in my Way of Love.  But you see that I must send you into the world so that you will fully experience my presence in the healing you do each day.  My loyal servant Job was seen as a sinner by his friends. They erred in their thinking. Job’s loyalty and unwavering fidelity kept him bound to me. His family, friends and foes saw only pain where Job saw possibility.  Job remained in the world and allowed me to bring him to his fullness. My goodness calls forth laughter from your tears.  Your constancy calls forth rejoicing from your sorrow.  You must go out as I have asked. And you must trust me.

This is a difficult lesson to learn and it requires much trust.  When we have the time to read Job’s entire story we see that God does indeed abide with the little and the small.  We will see that God cares for the marginalized and the dispossessed.  God brings laughter and rejoicing to those who experience anxiety and pain.  What appears at first glance to be insignificant is – in the scope of eternity – the greatest of all.

For more reflections, enter the word inversion in the blog search bar and explore.


For more Carl Jung quotes, click on the image above or go to: http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Carl_Jung

Information on the life and work of the Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist Carl Jung, go to: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Carl-Jung 

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

wealth-and-poverty-logo[1]2 Corinthians 8:8-15

Wealth and Poverty

Footnotes tell us a great deal about Paul’s words here: “The dialectic of Jesus’ experience, expressed earlier in terms of life and death (5, 15), sin and righteousness (5, 21) is now rephrased in terms of poverty and wealth.  Many scholars think that this is a reference to Jesus’ preexistence with God (his ‘wealth’) and to his incarnation and death (his ‘poverty’) and they point to the similarity between this verse and Phil 2, 6-8.  Others interpret the wealth and poverty as succeeding phases of Jesus’ earthly existence, e.g. his sense of intimacy with God and then the desolation and the feeling of abandonment by God in his death (Mark 15, 34)”.

Once after Mass, a friend and I were discussing the homily and my friend offered his thinking on eternity.  He said that he never has a problem imagining that time goes on into infinity before us, but that he stumbles when he tries to think of how time yawns back into our past.  We concluded that this is one of the many mysteries we will never understand.

Today when we read these words of Paul, when we puzzle through the footnotes, when we think of how Christ always speaks to us through inversion, we believe that we are all looking for the intimacy with God we know exists.  We all are looking for that comfort which is total union with God, with one another.  We all are looking for the one person in whom we can place our total trust, the one person who always has our best interests in mind and heart.

That person is God whom we meet in Christ – the Christ we see in one another and the Christ we encounter in Scripture.  We are comforted in Christ by the Holy Spirit.  This is a mystery which we cannot unlock, yet it hovers always in our consciousness, tantalizes us with its fleeting clarity and its constant, enduring, encompassing emotion of love.

We so long to love.  We so long to be loved.  We so often forget . . . that we are love.

This is our wealth.  This is what we ought to hold dear.  For it is in forgetting this that we suffer poverty.  It is in remembering this, and thanking God for this gift of love and of self, that we know we are rich.  It is this marvelous God we are called to trust.


Adapted from a reflection written on June 13, 2008.

Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990. cf 285. Print.   

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Friday, June 19, 2020

955165_60482143-610x250[1]2 Corinthians 6:1-10

An Acceptable Time

“A series of seven rhetorically effective antitheses, contrasting negative external impressions with positive inner reality. Paul perceives his existence as a reflection of Jesus’ own and affirms an inner reversal that escapes outward observation.  The final two members illustrate two distinct kinds of paradox or apparent contradiction that are characteristic of apostolic experience”.  (Senior cf. 283)

We are treated as deceivers and yet are truthful . . . and so as disciples of Christ we must become accustomed to the world’s unbelief.

As unrecognized and yet acknowledged . . . and so as followers of Christ we must become comfortable with rejection.

As dying and behold we live . . . and so as members of the remnant we find that dying so that we might live a normal daily act.  

As chastised and yet not put to death . . . and so as apostles of the Living God we become accustomed to the scorn of others.

As sorrowful yet always rejoicing . . . and so as sisters and brothers of Christ who take up our cross daily we are assured that our mourning is turned into dancing.

As poor yet enriching many . . . and so as disciples sent into the world in twos we know that we need not take a purse or sandals for the journey.

As having nothing and yet possessing all things . . . and so as children of God we are gladdened by the knowledge that we lack for nothing when we hold only Christ, that we rise in new life when we forfeit the old, and that we are loved beyond imagining by the One who rescues us in an acceptable time.

But as for me, my prayer is to you, O Lord.
    At an acceptable time, O God,
    in the abundance of your steadfast love answer me in your saving faithfulness.  (Psalm 69:13)

For this and for all God’s goodness we give thanks as we sing of God’s loving fidelity, justice and mercy.   Amen.


Senior, Donald, ed. THE CATHOLIC STUDY BIBLE. New York, Oxford University Press, 1990.283. Print.

Image from: http://donaldcmoore.com/2013/05/08/at-an-acceptable-time/

For more thoughts on God’s Acceptable Time click on the image above or go to: http://donaldcmoore.com/2013/05/08/at-an-acceptable-time/

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