Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘willingness’


Matthew 2:1-12Leaving by Another Road – A Reprise

Epiphany Sunday, January 7, 2018

Edward Burne-Jones: The Adoration of the Magi

With Christmastide ended, we find ourselves observing the official feast of Epiphany. What significance does this feast hold for us? To further explore, we return to a Noontime reflection on the wisdom of the Magi. We reflect on the wisdom they reveal, the wisdom of patience, willingness, and  openness . . . as they listen to God’s voice that speaks within. 

I love this portion of the Christmas story.  The wise men are so wise that they are able to read Herod’s secret intent.  Nothing can be hidden from the wise because they are so connected to the creator that they seem to have special insight.  What they really have is patience, serenity, and a finely tuned ear for God’s word.  And so the wise men left for their own country by another road.

I am thinking about the number of times I have averted disaster because that calm, strong voice within indicated that I was to stay put.  We notice that an attitude of patience and a willingness to obey always accompany the wise.  They do not appear to be brash or excitable.  They do not speak harshly, nor are they silenced.  Like the Persistent Widow, they know when to persevere in speaking God’s word.  And like the Three Magi, they know when to stand down and melt away into God’s protecting presence.

The wise know when to stand and witness . . . and when to leave quietly by another road.

A reflection from June 7, 2011.

Read Full Post »



2 Samuel 24: Bold Penance

Friday, March 17, 2017

king david

Angelica Kauffman: The Prophet David reproaching King David

A Favorite from March 8, 2008.

We looked at the beginning of this chapter this past September when we focused on the idea that silence in a division means assent with those who speak.  I recalled my Dad’s words that sometimes it is stand up time.  Today, when we return to the same place in The Word, when we look deeper we can see another them, and this one is appropriate to our Lenten tide.

From the HARPERCOLLINS COMMENTARY (page 278): Yet once more it is not difficult to be impressed by David. He is boldly penitent (24:10-17).  He invites action against himself and his own house rather than the ordinary people: “these sheep, what have they done?” (v.17). He is unwilling to make an offering to [Yahweh] that has cost him nothing (v.24).

And so I ask myself: What is the tone of my penitence?  Am I bold as I declare myself openly to God?  Or do I cower?  Do I take my transgressions openly?  Or do I try to conceal them in some way?  Do I excuse myself, explain myself, rationalize my action or lack of action? But most importantly . . . 

Am I unwilling to make an offering to God that has cost me nothing?

Mays, James L., ed.  HARPERCOLLINS BIBLE COMMENTARY. New York, New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1988. 278. Print.

 

Read Full Post »


Saturday, May 11, 2013

restorejusticeimage[1]Philippians 1:27-30

Steadfastness in Faith

If ever we doubt that we are to be community and that we are called to find ways to bridge differences, we only need look as far as the Book of Acts and the Letters of the New Testament.

This is God’s doing.  I keep repeating these words to myself as I wend my way through the obstacles that present themselves to me each day. I have been planted in this time and place to bloom according to the gifts God sent with me. And so in accord with the covenant I share with God, I will continue to be steadfast, always hoping for the best outcome for all.

I share with you a quote which was sent to me several years ago.

Hope is all about the vision of what we believe our world can and should be . . . Hope enables us to believe that we can achieve some meaningful expression of justice, reconciliation and healing here and now even though the ultimate goal must always remain beyond our grasp.


John W. de Gruchy, Reconciliation: Restoring Justice

Hope, reconciliation, willingness, bridge-building, restoration, transformation.  These are only a few of the gifts we receive when we become disciples of Christ.

To learn more about restorative justice, go to: http://www.restorativejustice.org/articlesdb/articles/4385 and explore.

Adapted from a Noontime written on May 7, 2007.

Tomorrow, steadfastness in love . .  .

Read Full Post »


Thursday, May 9, 2013

6648f45035a47efdafeee4d3f3f056e4_XL[1]Nehemiah 13

A Prayer for Willingness

True hope differs from waiting in that it expects the impossible to become possible through our petition and in God’s action.  Today we might reflect on a mirror image to hope and conversion that we pondered yesterday: the juxtaposition of willingness and desire.  It is this willingness – rather than our desire – that refines us as faithful.  It is this willingness – and not mere desire – that marks us as God’s disciples.

But what might we gain, we ask ourselves, from being willing rather than willful?

Perhaps it is our willingness that God nurtures patiently, waiting for our readiness to participate fully in God through Christ.  Perhaps it is this measure of willingness that indicates our full and ready understanding of who God is and why we are created in God’s image.   Perhaps is it our willingness to withstand any difficulty, our determination to be disciples of Christ that signals our preparedness to believe that God can truly make all things possible.  Do we desire to be with God but try to avoid all obstacles in our journey?  Or are we willing to travel the road, despite its roadblocks, in full willingness?

As we read about Nehemiah warning against stepping into alien and pagan territory and relationships, we might remember the Good Samaritan parable told by Jesus.  A man from Samaria, considered to be an outcast by the Jewish community, helps an injured traveler on the road to Jerusalem while the Levite, one who has special status in the Jewish community, keeps himself separate and pure.  As we mature from our Old Testament self who seeks to merely understand God and enter into our New Testament self to seek union with God we leave our desire behind . . . and we enter into willingness. 

We fully experience God’s presence when we give over our human desire of wishing for the end result through expedient or easy means, when we surrender our willfulness in order to become willing.  But for this we need courage.

We genuinely live as God’s disciples when we cease asking for the easy route that has no brambles or pitfalls, when we take on the divine mantle of succumbing to the arduous journey of true willingness.   But for this we need strength.

And so we pray . . .

Dear and gracious God,

We hope to rest constantly in you; grant us your readiness.

We desire to follow faithfully the way of Christ; grant us your eagerness.

We expect to hurdle all obstacles that would keep us from you; grant us your strength.

We hope to respond willingly to your call no matter how difficult the journey; grant us your courage.

We ask that you hold us close to you. 

We ask that you keep us forever with you. 

We ask that you grace us with your willingness.

We ask this in Christ’s name, in unity with the Holy Spirit.  Amen. 

For more information about the contrast of willingness and willfulness, click on the image above or go to the 21 February 2013 Brookhaven Retreat blog post at:  http://www.brookhavenretreat.com/cms/blog-22/item/845-willful-or-willing

Adapted from a reflection written on July 21, 2009. 

Read Full Post »


Wednesday, May 8, 2013

willingness[1]Hosea 14

Conversion and Hope

God’s love is so immense that we are invited to conversion every moment of our lives – even when we have greatly sinned.  This is a message we have heard and seen on Easter Sunday.  It is a message the Spirit whispers to us constantly.  It is a message we need to examine again . . . for it is a message of hope.

Today we look again at the writings of Dom Augustin Guillerand, a French Carthusian monk who died in 1945.  He describes how we allow our will to take over our lives rather than allowing our willingness to teach us humility before God.  He writes: “The will is a master that has, in theory, the ordering of everything but, in fact, the full control of nothing . . . When we give God our will fully, little by little he takes the rest, all of our faculties, the whole [person].  The conquest no longer rests with us, but with God; it becomes his affair.  As he wishes and when he wishes, he will take our memory, our senses, our passions, our imagination, our intellect, and heart, and he does this by various stages through which we have to pass, and by the trials he sends us”.

In the story of Hosea we see a man who has dedicated his will to God to such an extent that he marries a prostitute because God calls him to this vocation.  Through his suffering and because of his pain, Hosea is able to call his people back to God; and Hosea continues to call each of us today.  In his beautiful prophecy, Hosea shows us how his love for Gomer never fails . . . and thus he shows us how God’s love never fails.

God’s love, as seen through Hosea, is a love in action.  It is a love that sacrifices self will for God’s will.  Hosea tells us that love heals disloyalty, it loves freely, it turns away from anger, it is like the dew to new shoots, it gives off a sweet fragrance, it brings life.  Hosea tells us that our hope lies in our own desire for and will to enter into conversion.  A turning back to God is all that is required.  This is a huge request to make of us – yet it is the simplest of tasks if we can only begin by taking one small step each day.  And we can begin by refusing to turn back to old, corrupt ways.  It is an act of love by the creator to call his created to union.  It is an act of love by the created to reply and to go.

The greatest love calls for conversion.  The greatest love answers this call.  The greatest love brings hope.  The greatest love takes up this hope and never lets it go.

I read back over the meditation: “Even if we have nothing to show for it . . .”   We cannot give up, even if there is nothing to show for our efforts because the will – our will – is formed by our constant and unwavering willingness to go to God with all trials.  This is the nature of a conversion that brings hope.

The greatest Love is God’s and we are called to live out this Love daily.  The greatest Love has never and will never be undone.  Let us embrace this Love willingly.

Cameron, Peter John. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 3.11 (2010). Print.  

Adapted from a Noontime written on March 11, 2010. 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: