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Posts Tagged ‘possibilities’


Rembrandt: Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Jerusalem

Jeremiah 39:15-18: A Gesture of Comfort

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Even among the twists and turns in the tangled web of intrigue which surround Jeremiah’s life, this prophet remains true to his God.  Both his words and actions reveal his total devotion to the Lord, and his life – like the flight of a well-aimed arrow – arcs through turbulent history to blaze a path as safe passageway for the faithful to follow.  No one, after reading this man’s story, can say that their burden is too weighty to carry.  Anyone can see – from Jeremiah’s story – that tragedy and loss are not always a bad thing.  We frequently find redemption in the ashes of failure.  But we must be open to the belief that all is possible through God.  We must demonstrate trust.

Today finds us at a point in Jeremiah’s story where he is rewarded by the invaders for maintaining his fidelity to God.  In the midst of horror comes a gesture of comfort.  Horrible events spin around Jeremiah.  The king and his sons have been captured by Nebuchadnezzar’s troops.  Zedekiah’s eyes have been put out, his sons have been executed.  The palace has been burned; the walls of the city are demolished; the deportation to Babylon has begun.  Jeremiah will be given permission to live where he likes – with the exiled or with the remnant.  A time of respite is upon him.

We do not know precisely where or how or when Jeremiah eventually dies; but one thing we know for certain is that he will remain as true to his God in his end days as we see him today.  Jeremiah will be rescued as he is always rescued.

Although there are times when we sit in the mud of the cistern of life, we too, are always rescued.  A word of comfort pierces the darkness.  A gesture of healing staunches a bleeding wound.  The sign of peace arrives at our door.  We know we are blessed.

In these graced moments amid life’s battles, we might pause to give thanks for such a healing and loving God.  All God asks in payment is our trust.


Written on October 20, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

For more on this prophet and his prophecy, see the Jeremiah – Person and Message page on this blog at: https://thenoontimes.com/the-book-of-our-life/the-old-testament/the-prophets/jeremiah-person-and-message/

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2 Thessalonians 3:1-4: Prayer

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Prayer is God’s gift.  Prayer is covenant.  Prayer is communion.  We experience a universal call to prayer.  Prayer is individual.  It is collective.  Prayer is powerful.

Through prayer and in God’s time and way, the mysteries of our faith are revealed to us.

Through prayer and in God’s time and way, we are called to petition in outrageous hope.

Through prayer and in God’s time and way, we may choose to love all – our friends and our enemies.

Through prayer and in God’s time and way, all things are possible.

Let us pray . . . unceasingly . . .


Written on October 15, 2008 and posted today as a Favorite.

Image from: http://www.setonparish.org/index.cfm?load=page&page=25

For more reflection, visit the Scripture as Prayer page on this blog at: https://thenoontimes.com/scripture-as-prayer/

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Monday, May 21, 2013

universe[1]Galatians 5:7-12

Be Not Mislead

This Pauline citation is perfect for us to read when we come up against an obstacle that looks unmovable. It reminds us that with God, all things are possible. Paul is writing in reference to the split which nearly happens in the early church between two factions: those who want to require circumcision of men before entrance into the church and those who do not. A lively conversation takes place but the miracle of unification occurs and the church as Christ begins it remains intact and flourishes. We can read the details in ACTS.

I once heard miracles defined as the possibilities we dream that already exist but that cannot be seen with human eyes, cannot be heard with human ears, cannot be touched with human hands. In the documentary/fictional story What the Bleep Do We Know?, we are reminded to hope for our impossible petitions in a daily litany.  The creators of this film examine how we might adjust our perspective just slightly so that we might see as God sees because – as we know – with God all things are possible.

It is worth our while to sit with a good study Bible and a concordance to examine the many times we are told in scripture . . . With God, all things are possible.  The effects of these five simple words are healing.  The reality of this short sentence is more real than the world we imagine we live in.

Each time we repeat these words and believe them a layer of anxiety slips away.  Each time we witness to God’s impossible possibilities a new strength and boldness lifts our spirit.  Each time we admit to the quiet miracles that pepper our lives, a new patience and serenity infuse our bones.

We must give ourselves the gift of allowing the Easter reality of impossible possibilities to be our reality.  We must petition God each day with our list of impossible requests and ask that God consider them as our realityAnd we must not allow ourselves to be misled by the pessimism of the world for as we so well know from our daily Noontime with scripture . . . with God, all things are possible.

May all of our miracles that we ask of God come to fullness in our new impossible reality.

If you have two hours, click on this link and watch: What the Bleep Do We Know? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioONhpIJ-NY   Critics comment that it misrepresents science and makes awkward connections between quantum physics and spirituality.  Others say that is an invitation to think in a new way.  In either case, the thinking is worth our reflection. 

Adapted from a Noontime written on May 2, 2007.

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In this week when we give thanks for all that we are and all that we have, let us reflect on what it means to be first or last. 

Monday, November 19, 2012 – Mark 10:17-31 – Being Last

The rich man asks Jesus how he can gain admission to heaven.  Jesus answers plainly: Put aside all that you have . . . and follow me.  How simple.  How difficult.

Jesus calls each of us to put away all that enthralls us . . . for love of him.  This means that we put aside all that secures our identity, all that maintains our confidence . . . and trust solely in him.  This means that we learn to live in liminal space . . . because that is where heaven is.

Test me, O Lord, and try me; examine my heart and my mind.

For your love is before my eyes; I have walked faithfully with you.

I have not sat with the worthless, nor do I consort with the deceitful.

I have hated the company of evildoers; I will not sit down with the wicked.

I will wash my hands in innocence, O Lord; that I may go in procession round your altar;

Singing aloud a song of thanksgiving and recounting all your wonderful deeds.

                                                                                          Psalm 26:2-7

I have learned an important lesson and have lately felt its echo come back to me as it reverberates through a lifetime.  Of our own will we can do nothing.  We best acknowledge this by letting go of all that secures us to life.  We best experience this by falling backward over what appears to be a precipice.  In the letting go of familiarity . . . in the floating . . . we feel God’s presence.  This is what happens when we put God first.  This is what we feel when we put ourselves last.

Jesus says:  It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle that it is for a rich man to enter heaven. 

And we reply:  But where are we to go?  What are we do?  How will we live?  Surely we will die!  We are only human!

And Jesus replies: With men it is impossible, but not with God; for all things are possible with God. 

Do we trust our maker to catch us when we fall?  Do we understand that his love is greater than all else?  Can we put God first . . . and ourselves last?

Test me, O Lord, and try me; examine my heart and my mind.  For your love is before my eyes; I have walked faithfully with you . . .

Let us go in procession around the Lord’s altar . . . Singing aloud a song of thanksgiving and recounting all [God’s] wonderful deeds . . . and let us trust him who loves us . . . him for whom all things are possible.  Let us be willing to go last in the altar procession as we sing our altar song.

Test me, O Lord, and try me; examine my heart and my mind.  For your love is before my eyes; I have walked faithfully with you . . .

First written on November 15, 2008.  Re-written and posted today as a Favorite.

To better understand our call to “fall” into Christ, please see: Rohr, Richard. FALLING UPWARD: A SPIRITUALITY FOR THE TWO HALVES OF LIFE. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2011. Print.  (Rohr 65)

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