Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Favorite’ Category


Zephaniah 1: De-Creation – Part III

Let us give God praise, and intercede for those who harm us, for it is easy to intercede for those we love.

Holy Tuesday, April 11, 2017

At that time I will explore Jerusalem with lamps . . .

We cannot judge others.  We can only gauge ourselves based on our own daily rate of improvement.  My Dad always used to say: Don’t ever compare yourself to anyone else.  You will always come up short.  You will be far better or far worse than everyone else, and you will have not learned anything about yourself.  He would continue:  Compare yourself to yourself.  Are you a better person today than you were yesterday?  If so, good.  Keep on going!  If not, you need to change; you better do something about it!

Today we read about God’s wish to de-create all that God has created.  Let us be like Abraham who pleaded for time to find a good man in Sodom.  Let us be like Moses who pointed out to Yahweh that it would not look so good if Yahweh saved people only to destroy them.  Let us be like Ruth who remains faithful against odds and all possibility. Let us be like Mary who said yes to God’s outrageous proposal to bring new life to a dead world through the promise of a child.

Let us ask intercession for all those who harm, those who hate, those who de-construct our world with their anger or indifference. Let us give thanks for creation; and let us give thanks for the de-creation that brings us to redemption. Let us praise God’s name.  Let us celebrate the goodness and mercy of God.  Let us intercede for one another.

Let us be co-creators and co-redeemers with God.  Let us ask to participate in miracles.  Let us believe in the fullness of God’s plan.  Let us love all those who have abandoned God.  Let us bring light in to the darkness. For this is the work of the remnant.

On this Holy Tuesday, let us be Remnant for God.

Adapted from a Favorite written on Palm Sunday, March 16, 2008.

Read Full Post »


Zephaniah 1: De-Creation – Part II

Holy Monday, April 10, 2017

At that time I will explore Jerusalem with lamps . . .

Many times the early apostles shook the dust of an un-hearing town or people from their feet and their cloaks.  When they offered peace and that peace did not return to them, they moved on but remained open to the possibility of change, knowing that the work of conversion in these unbelievers was God’s work and not theirs.  If they were to play a part in a particular person’s transformation, they trusted the Holy Spirit to lead them to that spot in time and space, to that person into whose life they would enter . . . to be Christ at a moment of crisis or conversion.  This is how the Trinity functions in us.  This is the Mystery of Creation that works to transform the forces of de-creation into forces of restoration, healing and kingdom building.

God reveals the nature of God to each creature in a time known best only to God.  I like to think of the image of God searching through the tiniest streets of Jerusalem, holding a lamp high in search of the unbelievers who hide in dark places.  I also like to think of God’s modern apostles being the light that streams from this lantern.  We do nothing on our own.  We emanate from God . . . for God . . . in God . . . for the economy of salvation.  We can be a part of that salvation as co-redeemers, or we can be de-creators.  We have a choice to make.  Are we those who lurk in dark places, hiding from the light of truth, feeling comfort in the darkness?  Are we those who hunger for mercy and truth, feeling comfort only in the light?

On this Holy Monday, let us be Remnant for God.

Adapted from a Favorite written on Palm Sunday, March 16, 2008.

Read Full Post »


Zephaniah 1: De-Creation – Part I

Palm Sunday, April 9, 2017

For a week, we have traveled the road to Emmaus, Jesus at our side as we look for joy. Like the disciples, we may be immersed in our sorrow, and we may not know that joy walks with us. Today the prophet Zephaniah tells us that we must de-create before we can renew the image of God we bring to the world. In this holiest of weeks, we pledge to remain faithful to Christ who guides us. We persist in stepping into the world embodying the love the Spirit nurtures in us. And we promise to remain in Christ as the hope-filled remnant of God.

At that time I will explore Jerusalem with lamps . . .

The prophet Zephaniah lived in a time when many Jews had returned to polytheism.  Here we have a description of how Yahweh will undo his beautiful creation which has been profaned.  He will even take a lamp and search the nooks and crannies of Jerusalem’s streets in order to find the last of the unfaithful.  Thank goodness we hear at the end of this prophecy that a remnant of the faithful will remain, but in this first chapter, there is nothing happy to hear.

How painful it must be for God to watch as we de-construct what is given to us in love.  Not only do we abuse the wondrous gift of Nature and Mother Earth, but we abuse one another and ourselves as well.  What do we do when we discover that we are in relationships that pollute our thinking and our hearts?

At that time I will explore Jerusalem with lamps . . .

First, we turn to the one who created us and who knows us so well.  We turn and return to God.  Then, we pray and we act.  We pray for the personal strength to see us through the trials that lie in our path.  We pray for those who wreck damage on themselves and others.  We ask for forgiveness, both personal and communal.  We practice justice and compassion as best we can, wherever we can. And we ask for the gift of forgiveness and healing for the world.

On this Palm Sunday, let us follow the steps of the Master Teacher; and let us be Remnant for God.

Adapted from a Favorite written on Palm Sunday, March 16, 2008.

Read Full Post »


Luke 24:13-35: The Road to Emmaus – Part II

Monday, April 3, 2017

Pieter Coecke van Aelst: Christ and His Disciples on Their Way to Emmaus

Yesterday we spent time with the story of the disciples who encounter Jesus on the road to Emmaus. Today we imagine the possibilities in our lives if every time we come up against an obstacle we might recognize Christ’s presence and invite him to linger.

In an intense flash, at the breaking of the bread, we suddenly become fully aware of the identity of our companion.  We abruptly comprehend why we have felt so light and happy as we journey to Emmaus.  We realize that the hopes we have put away may be taken back out.  The faith we have placed in God’s plan is still valid.  The love we wish to share is still viable.  The Teacher has not lied to us in some silly attempt to ease the pain of our days.  The Teacher has offered – still offers – an opportunity of intimacy with him previously unknown to humankind.  And we disciples who have left Jerusalem in fear and sadness . . . now retrace our steps to return to the crucible of conflict which our Way of living brings us.  We are transformed.  We no longer allow fear overcome courage.  We do what Paul urges all of us to do – and we heard this yesterday – we put on Christ, the only protection we need.

We notice that Jesus leaves when the disciples recognize him, but his Spirit remains. And Jesus expects that now we will be his hands, his feet, his teaching.  We are Emmaus People . . .

A Favorite from March 31, 2009.

 

Read Full Post »


Luke 24:13-35: The Road to Emmaus – Part I

Fifth Sunday of Lent, April 2, 2017

Fritz von Uhde: The Road to Emmaus

We are quickly approaching Eastertide, my favorite time of year when we want to believe that the story we have heard is true:  we are truly free, the miracle of restoration and resurrection exists, we are already building the kingdom.  Today’s reading is The Road to Emmaus, a story we hear read out to us at Mass following Easter when our hearts are heavy from witnessing the crucifixion but light because the tomb is empty.  If only we might realize that we are Emmaus People, a people who hold a truth too wonderful to keep secret.

I imagine that I have spent much of my life in the same way as these two disciples who leave Jerusalem after the events surrounding Christ’s Passion and Crucifixion.  Things have gotten too hot to handle.  Disappointment at the squashing of a ground swell movement and the execution of its leader has overcome any sense of joy they have previously experienced.  It seems that all good has been wiped from the face of the earth; all light has been sucked from the world.  And yet . . . they journey home in hope, sharing stories of the heady glory days when all possibilities were actually possible.  They meet a fellow traveler and journey with him, drink in his words feeling oddly satisfied and content . . . they invite him to linger.

Léon-Augustin Lhermitte: Friend of the Humble (Supper at Emmaus)

In an intense flash, at the breaking of the bread, they suddenly become fully aware of the identity of this companion.  They abruptly comprehend why they have felt so light and happy as they made their way to Emmaus.  They realize that the hopes they had put away may be taken back out.  The faith they had placed in God’s plan was still valid.  The love they wished to share was still viable.  The Teacher had not lied to them in some silly attempt to ease the pain of their days.  The Teacher had offered – still offered – an opportunity of intimacy with him previously unknown to humankind.  And these two disciples who had left Jerusalem in fear and sadness . . . now retrace their steps to return to the crucible of conflict which their Way of living brought them.  They are transformed.  They are no longer allowing fear to overcome courage.  They do what Paul urges the Ephesians and all of us to do; they have put on Christ, the only protection they need.

We can put ourselves into this story because Luke has left these protagonists nameless.

Things have gotten too hot to handle.  Disappointment at the squashing of a ground swell movement and the execution of its leader has overcome any sense of joy we have previously experienced.  It seems that all good has been wiped from the face of the earth; all light has been sucked from the world.  And yet . . . we journey home in hope, sharing stories of the heady glory days when all possibilities were actually possible.  We meet a fellow traveler and journey with him, drink in his words feeling oddly satisfied and content . . . we invite him to linger. 

Tomorrow, imagine . . .

A Favorite from March 31, 2009.

Read Full Post »


Acts 28:30-31: Remaining

Saturday, April 1, 2017

We want a story to have an end, and so it may perplex us to read the closing verses of this book which is an accounting of how the Holy Spirit came to dwell among us.  I like the fact that there is no denouement which closes things in a precise manner, because this puts the conclusion of the narrative where it belongs . . . in our hands.

What do we bring to the Good News?  How do we continue the story?  How does the Spirit remain in us?  How do we witness?  How do we become Christ’s hands and feet and voice for the world?

We hold in our hands the power to heal one another by our willingness to listen actively and to act compassionately.

What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we looked upon and touched with our hands concerns the Word of life – for the life was made visible; we have seen it and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was made visible to us.  1 John 1:1-2

This was part of last evening’s prayer in MAGNIFICAT and it speaks to the apostles’ desire to continue to tell the story they had lived with Jesus, the story they continued to live with the Resurrected Christ, the story we may all live today if we might only remain in our lodgings to proclaim the kingdom.  I do not mean by this that we sit at home waiting for seekers to knock at our door; rather  I do mean to say that we might remain in Christ as we live each moment of our lives . . . and thus we bring Christ to the world.

To remain with one another . . . this is what it means to remain in Christ.  We are called to bring our diverse gifts and our diverse selves into union with one another.  This has been so from the beginning, it is so now, and it will always be so; therefore, let us gather together and remain. 

A Favorite from March 26, 2009.

Cameron, Peter John. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 25.3 (2009). Print.  

 

Read Full Post »


Job 19Suffering and Rejoicing Well

Friday, March 31, 2017

A Favorite from March 25, 2009.

The Book of Job is the first in the wisdom portion of scripture and it is one of my favorites.  I like the honesty and persistence with which this innocent man speaks.  He has been wronged by Satan, yet retains faith and hope in God.  He asks the questions we all ask; he makes the observations we all make: why do the wicked seem to skate through life without suffering, and why do the innocent suffer?  Each of us has endured hardship as Job does at one time or another; and for this reason his words are so valuable.  Job sinks into the lowest of depths with his despair; yet he soars with great hope and divine love.  This is the gift of his story . . . that he both suffers and rejoices well.

How long will you vex my soul?  At times the suffering is too great, too heavy.

I cry for help; there is no redress.  In our own lives, and in the lives of others, there are moments that ask too much of human strength and endurance.

My brethren have withdrawn from me, and my friends are wholly estranged.  At times we are utterly alone, with no sheltering place, no healing balm.

All my intimate friends hold me in horror; those whom I love have turned against me!  In the human experience, there is no greater punishment than isolation.

Why do you hound me as though you were divine, and insatiably prey on me?  At times we are so low that we descend into pits we did not know existed . . . and this is when we know that something new is arriving.

But as for me, I know that my Vindicator lives, and that he will at last stand forth upon the dust; whom I myself shall see: my own eyes, not another’s shall behold him.  Job understands that it is impossible for us to comprehend the depth, the width, the height or the timelessness of God.  Job – although not content with the mystery of his innocent suffering – accepts that from where he stands he cannot see or know the limitlessness of God or the complexity of his plan.  Job reminds us that each of us suffers.  Each of us stands accused at times when we are innocent.  Since this is so . . . the rest of his story is also true . . . we will be vindicated.

From today’s MAGNIFICAT Meditation about the Blessed Mother and her willingness to suffer as an innocent for the good of God’s economy: She neither regretted the past nor wished for the future – she accepted wholeheartedly the magnificent present.  She had found one beautiful pearl, and all she had she gave in order to buy it.  (Mother Marie des Douleurs)

So let us follow the example of Job and the example of Mary.  They understood that they, by entering into the mystery of suffering, were sharing in a sacred gift offered by the God who loves us so much . . . that he offers us his own divinity

Let us enter into today without looking back in anger or looking forward in despair.

Let us gather all that we have and all that we are to make this one purchase, the gift of transformative union where, through suffering, we enter into the world of God’s joy.

Cameron, Peter John. “Meditation of the Day.” MAGNIFICAT. 25.3 (2009). Print.  A wonderful resource to suffer well is Marlena Graves’ book, A Beautiful Disaster: Finding Hope in the Midst of Brokenness. For more information, click on the book image. 

Or visit the site A Field Guide for Suffering by clicking on the images above.

Read Full Post »


Job 29:18-20The Phoenix

Thursday, March 30, 2017

We have looked at Job frequently during our Noontimes, and this is good . . . because this book holds so much wisdom.  Today we reflect on the opportunity we have each day to rise like a mythical phoenix from the ashes of yesterday.

During this time when we anticipate the celebration of Resurrection, New Hope, and New Life, it is also a time to celebrate the quality of mercy which creates new life from old.  We learn so much more deeply when we are strained to a limit.  We remember the lesson so much better when we have felt the panic of knowing that we have skated too close to the edge of the ice.  We know, feel and can give compassion with so much more integrity when we have received it from someone.  When we have been at the end of a rope or at the bottom of a pit and we have received a healing and helping hand. This is when our character is forged.  This is how we draw close to who we can be.  This is how we become genuine.

The goal of suffering well is to allow the conversion of our pain to a healing, compassionate response, and to offer this new-found empathy to those who follow.  We become the experienced ear, the honest voice, the curing hand.  And when we think about it, we realize that this is the only way that suffering can make any sense.

So today and all days, let us remember that each morning we are given an awesome gift as we open our eyes and rise to greet the new day. We are given again the opportunity to rise from our own ashes.

A Favorite from March 31, 2008.

Read Full Post »


Psalm 20: Prayer in Time of War

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Psalm 20 tells us the words we all want to hear: The Lord answer you in time of distress; the name of the God of Jacob defend you!

We do not have to rely on our own resources when we find ourselves in distress.  We only need to rely on God; but this is usually easier said than done.  Sometimes we are called to learn new behaviors.  We are called to move out of comfort zones; but when we do, we take the temple with us for we are temples of God.

May God send you help from the temple, from Zion be your support.

So often we think that no one understands the sacrifices we make in life.  We may feel that no one can empathize with our particular situation.  Sometimes we feel alone and when we do, we now that it is time to take our suffering to God for we can be assured that God understands.  God knows how our sacrifice takes its toll on us.

May God remember your every offering, graciously accept your holocaust.

We make plans every day.  We talk about these plans with others and with God.  And when we do, we must plumb the depths of our heart to find the genesis of these plans.  Do they flow from God?  Do they reflect the Gospel?  Do we knock at heaven’s door with our hearts open and vulnerable to God?  When we ask in Jesus’ name, we receive but always in God’s plan and in God’s time.

Grant what is in your heart, fulfill your every plan.

When we pray to saints, to the Blessed Mother, to our deceased loved ones and to God, we need to present the most difficult problems for resolution.  We need to take our hopes and our dreams to the ones who intervene on our behalf, who nurture us as we grow, the ones who know us so well, the one who created us.

The Lord grant your every prayer!

May we remember in times of goodness and in times of turmoil to turn to God.

The Lord grant your every prayer!

In this Lenten season, may we remember that God forgives.

The Lord grant your every prayer!

As we near the Eastertide, may we ask for an Easter wish . . . and may it be granted!

The Lord answer you in time of distress; the name of the God of Jacob defend you!

The Lord grant your every prayer!

Amen!

A reflection from March 7, 2008.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: